Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193876
Title:
Astronomical Adaptive Optics using Multiple Laser Guide Stars
Author:
Baranec, Christoph James
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Over the past several years, experiments in adaptive optics involving multiple natural and laser guide stars have been carried out at the 1.55 m Kuiper telescope and the 6.5 m MMT telescope. The astronomical imaging improvement anticipated from both ground-layer and tomographic adaptive optics has been calculated. Ground-layer adaptive optics will reduce the effects of atmospheric seeing, increasing the resolution and sensitivity of astronomical observations over wide fields. Tomographic adaptive optics will provide diffraction-limited imaging along a single line of sight, increasing the amount of sky coverage available to adaptive optics correction.A new facility class wavefront sensor has been deployed at the MMT which will support closed-loop adaptive optics correction using a constellation of five Rayleigh laser guide stars and the deformable F/15 secondary mirror. The adaptive optics control loop was closed for the first time around the focus signal from all five laser signals in July of 2007, demonstrating that the system is working properly. It is anticipated that the full high-order ground-layer adaptive optics loop, controlled by the laser signals in conjunction with a tip/tilt natural guide star, will be closed in September 2007, with the imaging performance delivered by the system optimized and evaluated.The work here is intended to be both its own productive scientific endeavor for the MMT, but also as a proof of concept for the advanced adaptive optics systems designed to support observing at the Large Binocular Telescope and future extremely large telescopes such as the Giant Magellan Telescope.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
adaptive optics; infrared instrumentation; wavefront sensing; laser guide stars; tomography
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Optical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Lloyd-Hart, Michael
Committee Chair:
Lloyd-Hart, Michael

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAstronomical Adaptive Optics using Multiple Laser Guide Starsen_US
dc.creatorBaranec, Christoph Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.authorBaranec, Christoph Jamesen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOver the past several years, experiments in adaptive optics involving multiple natural and laser guide stars have been carried out at the 1.55 m Kuiper telescope and the 6.5 m MMT telescope. The astronomical imaging improvement anticipated from both ground-layer and tomographic adaptive optics has been calculated. Ground-layer adaptive optics will reduce the effects of atmospheric seeing, increasing the resolution and sensitivity of astronomical observations over wide fields. Tomographic adaptive optics will provide diffraction-limited imaging along a single line of sight, increasing the amount of sky coverage available to adaptive optics correction.A new facility class wavefront sensor has been deployed at the MMT which will support closed-loop adaptive optics correction using a constellation of five Rayleigh laser guide stars and the deformable F/15 secondary mirror. The adaptive optics control loop was closed for the first time around the focus signal from all five laser signals in July of 2007, demonstrating that the system is working properly. It is anticipated that the full high-order ground-layer adaptive optics loop, controlled by the laser signals in conjunction with a tip/tilt natural guide star, will be closed in September 2007, with the imaging performance delivered by the system optimized and evaluated.The work here is intended to be both its own productive scientific endeavor for the MMT, but also as a proof of concept for the advanced adaptive optics systems designed to support observing at the Large Binocular Telescope and future extremely large telescopes such as the Giant Magellan Telescope.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectadaptive opticsen_US
dc.subjectinfrared instrumentationen_US
dc.subjectwavefront sensingen_US
dc.subjectlaser guide starsen_US
dc.subjecttomographyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLloyd-Hart, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.chairLloyd-Hart, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAngel, J. Roger P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWyant, Jamesen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2357en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748239en_US
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