Affect in Secondary Students' Reading as Revealed by their Emotional Responses in Retrospective Miscue Analysis

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193870
Title:
Affect in Secondary Students' Reading as Revealed by their Emotional Responses in Retrospective Miscue Analysis
Author:
Liwanag, Maria Perpetua Socorro U.
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to explore and understand the emotional responses of selected high school readers when they engage in retrospective miscue analysis.Several data sets were collected through audio and video taping of interviews, readings, and individual and group sessions. Analysis of the data involved the use of In Depth procedure of miscue analysis to examine readers' meaning construction, grammatical patterns, and word substitution similarities. Results from the miscue analysis sessions were used to engage the students in retrospective miscue analysis (RMA). RMA consisted of engaging readers to reflect and evaluate the reading process and strategies by analyzing their miscues. Their emotional responses during the RMA sessions were examined and analyzed to describe patterns in readers' revalued voices. Martin and White's (2005) appraisal theory was used to analyze student's emotional responses. Appraisal theory is based on Halliday's systemic functional linguistic view of language.Research findings indicated that readers became adept at articulating their own strategies, fine tuned their own affective stance about reading and used what they know about miscues and reading to better themselves as readers. Their emotional responses towards reading also changed over time as students began to use linguistic resources to agree, disagree, critique, and position their listeners to their own assessments and adapted their own revalued voice about who they are as readers. Readers' miscues also showed that they began to focus more on making meaning, thus improving their reading.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
retrospective miscue analysis; miscue analysis; emotions and reading; affect and reading; secondary students; emotional responses in RMA
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Language, Reading & Culture; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Goodman, Yetta M.
Committee Chair:
Goodman, Yetta M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAffect in Secondary Students' Reading as Revealed by their Emotional Responses in Retrospective Miscue Analysisen_US
dc.creatorLiwanag, Maria Perpetua Socorro U.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLiwanag, Maria Perpetua Socorro U.en_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to explore and understand the emotional responses of selected high school readers when they engage in retrospective miscue analysis.Several data sets were collected through audio and video taping of interviews, readings, and individual and group sessions. Analysis of the data involved the use of In Depth procedure of miscue analysis to examine readers' meaning construction, grammatical patterns, and word substitution similarities. Results from the miscue analysis sessions were used to engage the students in retrospective miscue analysis (RMA). RMA consisted of engaging readers to reflect and evaluate the reading process and strategies by analyzing their miscues. Their emotional responses during the RMA sessions were examined and analyzed to describe patterns in readers' revalued voices. Martin and White's (2005) appraisal theory was used to analyze student's emotional responses. Appraisal theory is based on Halliday's systemic functional linguistic view of language.Research findings indicated that readers became adept at articulating their own strategies, fine tuned their own affective stance about reading and used what they know about miscues and reading to better themselves as readers. Their emotional responses towards reading also changed over time as students began to use linguistic resources to agree, disagree, critique, and position their listeners to their own assessments and adapted their own revalued voice about who they are as readers. Readers' miscues also showed that they began to focus more on making meaning, thus improving their reading.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectretrospective miscue analysisen_US
dc.subjectmiscue analysisen_US
dc.subjectemotions and readingen_US
dc.subjectaffect and readingen_US
dc.subjectsecondary studentsen_US
dc.subjectemotional responses in RMAen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading & Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGoodman, Yetta M.en_US
dc.contributor.chairGoodman, Yetta M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAnders, Patricia L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRuiz, Richard C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1687en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137356747en_US
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