Drug Metabolizing Enzyme, Drug Transporter Expression And Drug Disposition Are Altered In Models Of Inflammatory Liver Disease

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193836
Title:
Drug Metabolizing Enzyme, Drug Transporter Expression And Drug Disposition Are Altered In Models Of Inflammatory Liver Disease
Author:
Lickteig, Andrew Joseph
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Correct dosing in pharmacotherapeutics is based on the idea that too much of a drug will cause toxicity, while too little will result in failure to elicit the desired response. A major factor in the ability of a patient to handle any dose of a drug is the capacity to metabolize and eliminate that drug from the body. For the vast majority of drugs, the liver plays a key role in determining the rate at which drugs are eliminated. First, drugs must be taken up across the cell membrane into hepatocytes by uptake transporters. Once inside the hepatocyte, biotransformation enzymes metabolize and conjugate the drug to a more water-soluble compound, the distribution of which is more easily controlled. These water-soluble metabolites are then transported out of the hepatocyte by additional drug transporters either into bile for elimination, or back into the blood.More than 2 million severe adverse drug reactions occur in the US each year and often result from interindividual variation in the ability to metabolize and eliminate drugs. This number does not include medical errors, but rather circumstances where an individual is unable to handle the standard dose of the correctly prescribed drug. Although genetics plays an important role, the greatest source of variation comes from other environmental factors such as disease states. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic condition that comprises a spectrum of histopathologies that range from simple steatosis to the more severe steatohepatitis. Specifically, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has become one of the leading causes for liver transplantation in the United States, and thus clearly become a considerable burden to the U.S. healthcare system.It is not known whether the capacity of the liver to metabolize and excrete drugs is altered in patients with NASH. Because the liver plays such a critical role in drug metabolism and disposition, any disease state that disrupts or modifies these functions will alter the fate of a given drug within the body. It is therefore very likely that the ability of the liver to metabolize and excrete clinically relevant drugs is compromised in NASH patients.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
drug transporters; Mrp; acetaminophen; inflammation; nonalcoholic steatohepatitis; NASH
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Pharmacology & Toxicology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Cherrington, Nathan J.
Committee Chair:
Cherrington, Nathan J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleDrug Metabolizing Enzyme, Drug Transporter Expression And Drug Disposition Are Altered In Models Of Inflammatory Liver Diseaseen_US
dc.creatorLickteig, Andrew Josephen_US
dc.contributor.authorLickteig, Andrew Josephen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractCorrect dosing in pharmacotherapeutics is based on the idea that too much of a drug will cause toxicity, while too little will result in failure to elicit the desired response. A major factor in the ability of a patient to handle any dose of a drug is the capacity to metabolize and eliminate that drug from the body. For the vast majority of drugs, the liver plays a key role in determining the rate at which drugs are eliminated. First, drugs must be taken up across the cell membrane into hepatocytes by uptake transporters. Once inside the hepatocyte, biotransformation enzymes metabolize and conjugate the drug to a more water-soluble compound, the distribution of which is more easily controlled. These water-soluble metabolites are then transported out of the hepatocyte by additional drug transporters either into bile for elimination, or back into the blood.More than 2 million severe adverse drug reactions occur in the US each year and often result from interindividual variation in the ability to metabolize and eliminate drugs. This number does not include medical errors, but rather circumstances where an individual is unable to handle the standard dose of the correctly prescribed drug. Although genetics plays an important role, the greatest source of variation comes from other environmental factors such as disease states. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic condition that comprises a spectrum of histopathologies that range from simple steatosis to the more severe steatohepatitis. Specifically, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has become one of the leading causes for liver transplantation in the United States, and thus clearly become a considerable burden to the U.S. healthcare system.It is not known whether the capacity of the liver to metabolize and excrete drugs is altered in patients with NASH. Because the liver plays such a critical role in drug metabolism and disposition, any disease state that disrupts or modifies these functions will alter the fate of a given drug within the body. It is therefore very likely that the ability of the liver to metabolize and excrete clinically relevant drugs is compromised in NASH patients.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectdrug transportersen_US
dc.subjectMrpen_US
dc.subjectacetaminophenen_US
dc.subjectinflammationen_US
dc.subjectnonalcoholic steatohepatitisen_US
dc.subjectNASHen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePharmacology & Toxicologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCherrington, Nathan J.en_US
dc.contributor.chairCherrington, Nathan J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGandolfi, A. Jayen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVaillancourt, Richard R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWright, Stephen H.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest2512en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748422en_US
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