Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193835
Title:
Biomass Production and Nutrient Dynamics in an Aquaponics System
Author:
Licamele, Jason David
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The goal of this study was to prove that aquaponic systems can produce lettuce of equal growth and quality compared to hydroponic lettuce production and to determine the stocking density of fish required for plant growth. Aquaponics is the integration of recirculating aquaculture and hydroponic plant production. The project had four objectives. The first objective was to determine the biomass of fish required for plant growth to develop a fish to plant density ratio. The second objective was to compare lettuce grown with aquaponic water and a hydroponic solution under the same environmental conditions. The third objective was to compare the quality of lettuce grown with aquaponics water plus nutrient supplementation with a hydroponic solution. The fourth objective was to determine the nitrogen dynamics in the aquaponic system and to compare the nutrient composition of lettuce grown with aquaponics water with nutrient supplementation and hydroponic solution. It was determined that under the specified environmental conditions 5 kg m⁻³ of Nile tilapia (O. niloticus) fed 2% of their body weight daily yields on average 4.7 kg m⁻² of lettuce (L. sativa cv. Rex) in 35 days. There was no significant difference (p ≤ 0.05) in biomass or chlorophyll concentration index in lettuce (L. sativa cv. Rex) grown with aquaponics water and nutrient supplements versus a hydroponic solution. The aquaponics solution generated equal biomass and chlorophyll concentration indexes compared to the hydroponic solution. Aquaponics water plus supplementation can yield L. sativa cv. Rex with equal biomass accumulation and chlorophyll concentration indexes compared to hydroponics lettuce. Nutrients added to the aquaponics system consisted of iron, manganese, and zinc. These nutrient concentrations became depleted in the aquaponics water over time and were not replenished via the fish feed. Dolomite was added to the aquaponics system every two weeks to increase the buffering capacity of the water and maintain optimal pH levels. Aquaponics lettuce had similar nutrient composition to hydroponic lettuce. One head of L. sativa cv. Rex (176.75 ± 31.03) will assimilate approximately 5.96 grams of nitrogen (3.38% per dry gram lettuce). One kilogram of fish will yield 6.4 lettuce heads (1,128 grams) and fixate 38.13 grams of nitrogen.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
aquaculture; aquaponics; greenhouse; hydroponics; lettuce; tilapia
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Giacomelli, Gene; Fitzsimmons, Kevin
Committee Chair:
Giacomelli, Gene; Fitzsimmons, Kevin

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleBiomass Production and Nutrient Dynamics in an Aquaponics Systemen_US
dc.creatorLicamele, Jason Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorLicamele, Jason Daviden_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe goal of this study was to prove that aquaponic systems can produce lettuce of equal growth and quality compared to hydroponic lettuce production and to determine the stocking density of fish required for plant growth. Aquaponics is the integration of recirculating aquaculture and hydroponic plant production. The project had four objectives. The first objective was to determine the biomass of fish required for plant growth to develop a fish to plant density ratio. The second objective was to compare lettuce grown with aquaponic water and a hydroponic solution under the same environmental conditions. The third objective was to compare the quality of lettuce grown with aquaponics water plus nutrient supplementation with a hydroponic solution. The fourth objective was to determine the nitrogen dynamics in the aquaponic system and to compare the nutrient composition of lettuce grown with aquaponics water with nutrient supplementation and hydroponic solution. It was determined that under the specified environmental conditions 5 kg m⁻³ of Nile tilapia (O. niloticus) fed 2% of their body weight daily yields on average 4.7 kg m⁻² of lettuce (L. sativa cv. Rex) in 35 days. There was no significant difference (p ≤ 0.05) in biomass or chlorophyll concentration index in lettuce (L. sativa cv. Rex) grown with aquaponics water and nutrient supplements versus a hydroponic solution. The aquaponics solution generated equal biomass and chlorophyll concentration indexes compared to the hydroponic solution. Aquaponics water plus supplementation can yield L. sativa cv. Rex with equal biomass accumulation and chlorophyll concentration indexes compared to hydroponics lettuce. Nutrients added to the aquaponics system consisted of iron, manganese, and zinc. These nutrient concentrations became depleted in the aquaponics water over time and were not replenished via the fish feed. Dolomite was added to the aquaponics system every two weeks to increase the buffering capacity of the water and maintain optimal pH levels. Aquaponics lettuce had similar nutrient composition to hydroponic lettuce. One head of L. sativa cv. Rex (176.75 ± 31.03) will assimilate approximately 5.96 grams of nitrogen (3.38% per dry gram lettuce). One kilogram of fish will yield 6.4 lettuce heads (1,128 grams) and fixate 38.13 grams of nitrogen.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectaquacultureen_US
dc.subjectaquaponicsen_US
dc.subjectgreenhouseen_US
dc.subjecthydroponicsen_US
dc.subjectlettuceen_US
dc.subjecttilapiaen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural & Biosystems Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGiacomelli, Geneen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFitzsimmons, Kevinen_US
dc.contributor.chairGiacomelli, Geneen_US
dc.contributor.chairFitzsimmons, Kevinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGiacomelli, Geneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFitzsimmons, Kevinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKubota, Chierien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCuello, Joelen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10779en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.