Development and Evaluation of Transit Signal Priority Strategies with Physical Queue Models

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193823
Title:
Development and Evaluation of Transit Signal Priority Strategies with Physical Queue Models
Author:
Li, Lefei
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
With the rapid growth in modern cities and congestion on major freeways and local streets, public transit services have become more and more important for urban transportation. As an important component of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), Transit Signal Priority (TSP) systems have been extensively studied and widely implemented to improve the quality of transit service by reducing transit delay. The focus of this research is on the development of a platform with the physical queue representation that can be employed to evaluate and/or improve TSP strategies with the consideration of the interaction between transit vehicles and queues at the intersection.This dissertation starts with deterministic analyses of TSP systems based on a physical queue model. A request oriented TSP decision process is then developed which incorporates a set of TSP decision regions defined on a time-space diagram with the physical queue representation. These regions help identify the optimal detector location, select the appropriate priority control strategy, and handle the situations with multiple priority requests. In order to handle uncertainties in TSP systems arising in bus travel time and dwell time estimation, a type-2 fuzzy logic forecasting system is presented and tested with field data. Type-2 fuzzy logic is very powerful in dealing with uncertainty. The use of Type-2 fuzzy logic helps improve the performance of TSP systems. The last component of the dissertation is the development of a Colored Petri Net (CPN) model for TSP systems. With CPN tools, computer simulation can be performed to evaluate various TSP control strategies and the decision process. Examples for demonstrating the process of implementing the green extension strategy and the proposed TSP decision process are presented in the dissertation. The CPN model can also serve as an interface between the platform developed in this dissertation and the implementation of the control strategies at the controller level.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Traffic Signal Control; Transit Signal Priority; Physical Queue Model
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Systems & Industrial Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Lin, Weihua
Committee Chair:
Lin, Weihua

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleDevelopment and Evaluation of Transit Signal Priority Strategies with Physical Queue Modelsen_US
dc.creatorLi, Lefeien_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Lefeien_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWith the rapid growth in modern cities and congestion on major freeways and local streets, public transit services have become more and more important for urban transportation. As an important component of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), Transit Signal Priority (TSP) systems have been extensively studied and widely implemented to improve the quality of transit service by reducing transit delay. The focus of this research is on the development of a platform with the physical queue representation that can be employed to evaluate and/or improve TSP strategies with the consideration of the interaction between transit vehicles and queues at the intersection.This dissertation starts with deterministic analyses of TSP systems based on a physical queue model. A request oriented TSP decision process is then developed which incorporates a set of TSP decision regions defined on a time-space diagram with the physical queue representation. These regions help identify the optimal detector location, select the appropriate priority control strategy, and handle the situations with multiple priority requests. In order to handle uncertainties in TSP systems arising in bus travel time and dwell time estimation, a type-2 fuzzy logic forecasting system is presented and tested with field data. Type-2 fuzzy logic is very powerful in dealing with uncertainty. The use of Type-2 fuzzy logic helps improve the performance of TSP systems. The last component of the dissertation is the development of a Colored Petri Net (CPN) model for TSP systems. With CPN tools, computer simulation can be performed to evaluate various TSP control strategies and the decision process. Examples for demonstrating the process of implementing the green extension strategy and the proposed TSP decision process are presented in the dissertation. The CPN model can also serve as an interface between the platform developed in this dissertation and the implementation of the control strategies at the controller level.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectTraffic Signal Controlen_US
dc.subjectTransit Signal Priorityen_US
dc.subjectPhysical Queue Modelen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSystems & Industrial Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLin, Weihuaen_US
dc.contributor.chairLin, Weihuaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWang, Feiyueen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHead, Larryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWissler, Craigen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1821en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746347en_US
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