Formant Deflection Directions of the Voiced Alveolar Stop Consonant in Different Vowel Contexts

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193822
Title:
Formant Deflection Directions of the Voiced Alveolar Stop Consonant in Different Vowel Contexts
Author:
Li, Kang
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A parametric model of the vocal tract area function was used to synthesize a series of alveolar stop consonant constrictions imposed on nine /VV/ transitions (e.g., /idae/). The constrictions differed in spatial characteristics, places of occurrence along the vocal tract length, and the onset and release times to create different onglide and offglide formant deflection patterns. It was hypothesized that the formant deflection directions caused by the onset and release of the consonant constriction relative to the underlying vowel-to-vowel formant transitions (i.e., without consonant perturbations) provide information about the perceptual identity of the alveolar stop. Perceptual tests were conducted to assess the phonemic identities of the formant patterns produced by the model. The model parameter settings used to create the consonant constrictions that were perceived as /d/'s were analyzed to study the coarticulation between /d/ and different vowel contexts.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Story, Brad H.
Committee Chair:
Story, Brad H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleFormant Deflection Directions of the Voiced Alveolar Stop Consonant in Different Vowel Contextsen_US
dc.creatorLi, Kangen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Kangen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA parametric model of the vocal tract area function was used to synthesize a series of alveolar stop consonant constrictions imposed on nine /VV/ transitions (e.g., /idae/). The constrictions differed in spatial characteristics, places of occurrence along the vocal tract length, and the onset and release times to create different onglide and offglide formant deflection patterns. It was hypothesized that the formant deflection directions caused by the onset and release of the consonant constriction relative to the underlying vowel-to-vowel formant transitions (i.e., without consonant perturbations) provide information about the perceptual identity of the alveolar stop. Perceptual tests were conducted to assess the phonemic identities of the formant patterns produced by the model. The model parameter settings used to create the consonant constrictions that were perceived as /d/'s were analyzed to study the coarticulation between /d/ and different vowel contexts.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech, Language, & Hearing Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorStory, Brad H.en_US
dc.contributor.chairStory, Brad H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBarkmeier-Kraemer, Julieen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBunton, Kateen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLee, Jungmeeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1842en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746388en_US
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