Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193818
Title:
A Theory OF Intraunit Justice Climate and Team Effectiveness
Author:
Li, Hongcai
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation evaluates a model linking intraunit justice climate to outcome variables (team performance, unit-level citizenship behavior, and satisfaction with teammates) through the mediating role of teamwork quality. Intraunit justice climate (IJC) is defined as the shared perception that team members treat each other fairly. IJC includes three dimensions: distributive, procedural, and interactional justice. Distributive IJC refers to the extent to which team members receive what they deserve based on their contribution. Procedural IJC refers to the extent to which team members use fair procedures in the decision making process in the team. Interactional IJC refers to the extent to which team members treat each other fairly interpersonally. In this dissertation, I argue that a high level of IJC may influence the pattern and quality of interaction among team members (teamwork quality), which in turn may influence team outcomes. This model was tested in a longitudinal study using 164 undergraduate project teams (N = 570). Participants responded to three surveys (each separated by four weeks) which assessed IJC (Time I), teamwork quality (Time II), unit-level citizenship behavior, and satisfaction with teammates (Time III). I also obtained team project grades as an indicator of team performance. Results of the study indicate that teamwork quality mediated the relationship between two dimensions of intraunit justice climate: distributive and procedural IJC, and indicators of team effectiveness: unit-level citizenship behavior and satisfaction with teammates. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings and directions for future research are discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
team effectiveness; organizational justice; interpersonal processes; unit-level justice
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Business Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Cropanzano, Russell
Committee Chair:
Cropanzano, Russell

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleA Theory OF Intraunit Justice Climate and Team Effectivenessen_US
dc.creatorLi, Hongcaien_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Hongcaien_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation evaluates a model linking intraunit justice climate to outcome variables (team performance, unit-level citizenship behavior, and satisfaction with teammates) through the mediating role of teamwork quality. Intraunit justice climate (IJC) is defined as the shared perception that team members treat each other fairly. IJC includes three dimensions: distributive, procedural, and interactional justice. Distributive IJC refers to the extent to which team members receive what they deserve based on their contribution. Procedural IJC refers to the extent to which team members use fair procedures in the decision making process in the team. Interactional IJC refers to the extent to which team members treat each other fairly interpersonally. In this dissertation, I argue that a high level of IJC may influence the pattern and quality of interaction among team members (teamwork quality), which in turn may influence team outcomes. This model was tested in a longitudinal study using 164 undergraduate project teams (N = 570). Participants responded to three surveys (each separated by four weeks) which assessed IJC (Time I), teamwork quality (Time II), unit-level citizenship behavior, and satisfaction with teammates (Time III). I also obtained team project grades as an indicator of team performance. Results of the study indicate that teamwork quality mediated the relationship between two dimensions of intraunit justice climate: distributive and procedural IJC, and indicators of team effectiveness: unit-level citizenship behavior and satisfaction with teammates. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings and directions for future research are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectteam effectivenessen_US
dc.subjectorganizational justiceen_US
dc.subjectinterpersonal processesen_US
dc.subjectunit-level justiceen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCropanzano, Russellen_US
dc.contributor.chairCropanzano, Russellen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGilliland, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGoldman, Barryen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2814en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749874en_US
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