Divided Nations: Policy, Activism and Indigenous Identity on the U.S.-Mexico Border

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193815
Title:
Divided Nations: Policy, Activism and Indigenous Identity on the U.S.-Mexico Border
Author:
Leza, Christina
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation addresses native activism in response to United States and Mexico border enforcement policies on the U.S.-Mexico border among indigenous peoples whose communities are divided by the international line. Fieldwork for the dissertation was conducted in collaboration with an indigenous grassroots community organization with members in both the U.S. and Mexico who advocate for rights of border mobility among native border peoples. This work discusses the impacts of border enforcement policies on native community cultural maintenance, local interpretations and uses of international human rights tools, and the challenges faced by U.S.-Mexico border native activists in communicating their ideologies to a broader public. This work further addresses the complex identity construction of Native Americans with cultural ties to Mexico, and conflations of race and nationality that result in distinct forms of intra-community racism.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
grassroots activism; identity; indigeneity; indigenous rights; U.S.-Mexico border
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Hill, Jane H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleDivided Nations: Policy, Activism and Indigenous Identity on the U.S.-Mexico Borderen_US
dc.creatorLeza, Christinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeza, Christinaen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation addresses native activism in response to United States and Mexico border enforcement policies on the U.S.-Mexico border among indigenous peoples whose communities are divided by the international line. Fieldwork for the dissertation was conducted in collaboration with an indigenous grassroots community organization with members in both the U.S. and Mexico who advocate for rights of border mobility among native border peoples. This work discusses the impacts of border enforcement policies on native community cultural maintenance, local interpretations and uses of international human rights tools, and the challenges faced by U.S.-Mexico border native activists in communicating their ideologies to a broader public. This work further addresses the complex identity construction of Native Americans with cultural ties to Mexico, and conflations of race and nationality that result in distinct forms of intra-community racism.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectgrassroots activismen_US
dc.subjectidentityen_US
dc.subjectindigeneityen_US
dc.subjectindigenous rightsen_US
dc.subjectU.S.-Mexico borderen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairHill, Jane H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHill, Jane H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPhilips, Susan U.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSheridan, Thomas E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGonzales, Patrisiaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10782en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753626en_US
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