The Rhetorical Legacies of Affirmative Action: Bootstrap Genres from College Admissions through First-Year Composition

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193813
Title:
The Rhetorical Legacies of Affirmative Action: Bootstrap Genres from College Admissions through First-Year Composition
Author:
Lewis, Rachel Devorah
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This project traces the ways universities articulate a desire for diversity through the gateway genres of college admissions, composition course placement, and first-year-composition (FYC). Together, these genres serve as points of access for a theoretical study that seeks to better understand the ideological function of writing programs to socialize borderline college applicants into the rhetorically constructed role of a Diverse College Student. I focus on what I call bootstraps genres--reoccurring rhetorical situations that call for students to recount social hardships like racism and classism as personal hardships to be overcome through personal heroics. Despite being immersed in rhetorics of individualism, the college application essay, the directed self-placement guide, and the literacy narrative all call for the mimetic construction of disadvantage as an appeal to college-readiness. As new college students move through the initiation rituals of admissions, orientation, and FYC, they are presented with rhetorical tasks that are both raced and classed. Bootstraps genres ask students to first read the university's desire for diversity and then fulfill that desire through personal stories of difference and disadvantage.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
affirmative action; basic writing; bootstraps; college application essay; composition; rhetoric
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Miller, Thomas P.
Committee Chair:
Miller, Thomas P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Rhetorical Legacies of Affirmative Action: Bootstrap Genres from College Admissions through First-Year Compositionen_US
dc.creatorLewis, Rachel Devorahen_US
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Rachel Devorahen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis project traces the ways universities articulate a desire for diversity through the gateway genres of college admissions, composition course placement, and first-year-composition (FYC). Together, these genres serve as points of access for a theoretical study that seeks to better understand the ideological function of writing programs to socialize borderline college applicants into the rhetorically constructed role of a Diverse College Student. I focus on what I call bootstraps genres--reoccurring rhetorical situations that call for students to recount social hardships like racism and classism as personal hardships to be overcome through personal heroics. Despite being immersed in rhetorics of individualism, the college application essay, the directed self-placement guide, and the literacy narrative all call for the mimetic construction of disadvantage as an appeal to college-readiness. As new college students move through the initiation rituals of admissions, orientation, and FYC, they are presented with rhetorical tasks that are both raced and classed. Bootstraps genres ask students to first read the university's desire for diversity and then fulfill that desire through personal stories of difference and disadvantage.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectaffirmative actionen_US
dc.subjectbasic writingen_US
dc.subjectbootstrapsen_US
dc.subjectcollege application essayen_US
dc.subjectcompositionen_US
dc.subjectrhetoricen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMiller, Thomas P.en_US
dc.contributor.chairMiller, Thomas P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHall, Anne-Marieen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLicona, Adelaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11338en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752261194en_US
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