ULTRASONIC TRANSDUCER MODELING FOR ACOUSTIC MICROSCOPY & ITS APPLICATION IN BIOLOGICAL MATERIAL CHARACTERIZATION

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193785
Title:
ULTRASONIC TRANSDUCER MODELING FOR ACOUSTIC MICROSCOPY & ITS APPLICATION IN BIOLOGICAL MATERIAL CHARACTERIZATION
Author:
Lee, Joon Pyo
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The determination of material properties for very small specimens such as biological cells or semiconductor microchips is extremely difficult and has been a challenging issue for several decades. One important constraint during these measurements is not to harm the specimens during the test process because the specimens, biological cells in particular, are vulnerable to the test itself even during a short period of testing time.Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is the only suitable precess for such applications. It is fast, causes no disturbance and can give a real time response while being cost effective. Many NDE methods are available today, such as, laser based techniques, Radiography, Magnetic techniques, High resolution photography and other optical techniques, MRI, acoustic and ultrasonic techniques to name a few. Ultrasound is the most popular tool for NDE. As specimens become smaller, the need for shorter wave length ultrasound increases dramatically.The use of acoustic waves in microscopy technology provides many more benefits than its conventional optical microscope counterpart. One such benefit is its ability to inspect a specimen in dark. Another is the capability to see inside an optically opaque specimen. Today, very high frequency, higher than 1 Giga Hertz (109 Hz), ultrasound is being used. This technology has improved at the same pace as the development of electronics and computer science. In acoustic microscopy experiments wave speed and wave attenuation in the specimen are measured by the V(f) technique. A specimen's density, Poisson's ratio and Young's modulus are directly related to the wave speed. V(f) method, as discussed in this dissertation, has some advantages over the more commonly used V(z) method. In order to correctly estimate the wave speed and attenuation in the specimen, the transducer modeling should be completed first. The Distributed Point Source Method (DPSM) is used in this dissertation to model a 1 GHz acoustic microscope lens. Then the model-predicted pressure field is used in a FORTRAN program to calculate the thickness profile and properties of biological cell specimens from experimental data.Transducer modeling at 1 GHz has rarely been attempted earlier because it requires an immense amount of computer time and memory. In this dissertation 1 GHz transducer modeling is conducted by taking advantage of the axisymmetric geometry of the acoustic microscope lens. This exploitation of symmetry in the modeling process has not been attempted prior to this dissertation.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
NONDESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Engineering Mechanics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
KUNDU, TRIBKRAM
Committee Chair:
KUNDU, TRIBKRAM

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleULTRASONIC TRANSDUCER MODELING FOR ACOUSTIC MICROSCOPY & ITS APPLICATION IN BIOLOGICAL MATERIAL CHARACTERIZATIONen_US
dc.creatorLee, Joon Pyoen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Joon Pyoen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe determination of material properties for very small specimens such as biological cells or semiconductor microchips is extremely difficult and has been a challenging issue for several decades. One important constraint during these measurements is not to harm the specimens during the test process because the specimens, biological cells in particular, are vulnerable to the test itself even during a short period of testing time.Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is the only suitable precess for such applications. It is fast, causes no disturbance and can give a real time response while being cost effective. Many NDE methods are available today, such as, laser based techniques, Radiography, Magnetic techniques, High resolution photography and other optical techniques, MRI, acoustic and ultrasonic techniques to name a few. Ultrasound is the most popular tool for NDE. As specimens become smaller, the need for shorter wave length ultrasound increases dramatically.The use of acoustic waves in microscopy technology provides many more benefits than its conventional optical microscope counterpart. One such benefit is its ability to inspect a specimen in dark. Another is the capability to see inside an optically opaque specimen. Today, very high frequency, higher than 1 Giga Hertz (109 Hz), ultrasound is being used. This technology has improved at the same pace as the development of electronics and computer science. In acoustic microscopy experiments wave speed and wave attenuation in the specimen are measured by the V(f) technique. A specimen's density, Poisson's ratio and Young's modulus are directly related to the wave speed. V(f) method, as discussed in this dissertation, has some advantages over the more commonly used V(z) method. In order to correctly estimate the wave speed and attenuation in the specimen, the transducer modeling should be completed first. The Distributed Point Source Method (DPSM) is used in this dissertation to model a 1 GHz acoustic microscope lens. Then the model-predicted pressure field is used in a FORTRAN program to calculate the thickness profile and properties of biological cell specimens from experimental data.Transducer modeling at 1 GHz has rarely been attempted earlier because it requires an immense amount of computer time and memory. In this dissertation 1 GHz transducer modeling is conducted by taking advantage of the axisymmetric geometry of the acoustic microscope lens. This exploitation of symmetry in the modeling process has not been attempted prior to this dissertation.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectNONDESTRUCTIVE EVALUATIONen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEngineering Mechanicsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKUNDU, TRIBKRAMen_US
dc.contributor.chairKUNDU, TRIBKRAMen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHaldar, Achintyaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCho, Myung Kyuen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1221en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747460en_US
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