Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin G20210A, and MTHFR C677T Polymorphisms in Cancer Patients with Venous Thromboembolism

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193768
Title:
Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin G20210A, and MTHFR C677T Polymorphisms in Cancer Patients with Venous Thromboembolism
Author:
Lattimore, Lois Eileen
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Intro/Aims: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common complication in cancer patients. The role of thrombophilic polymorphisms in cancer related VTE remains poorly explored. Aim 1 of this study was to determine if Factor V Leiden (G1691A), Prothrombin (PT) G20210A or methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T are associated with the increased occurrence of VTE in adult oncology subjects compared to nononcology subjects. Aim 2 of this study was to determine if cancer patients with the MTHFR C677T polymorphism who are treated with antimetabolite therapy have an increased incidence of VTE compared to cancer patients who are treated with other chemotherapy.Setting/Methods: A descriptive, comparative, retrospective chart analysis was utilized for this study in an outpatient hematology, oncology clinic in Southern Arizona. Enrolled were 100 adult subjects (age 18 - 85) with documented history of VTE (27 subjects with cancer and 73 noncancer). Subjects were evaluated for Factor V Leiden, PT G20210A, and MTHFR C677T prior to the study. Eleven subjects were treated with antimetabolite chemotherapy and 8 subjects were treated with other chemotherapy.Results: The overall polymorphism frequency for Factor V Leiden was 21%, PT G20210A 4%, and MTHFR C677T 50%. Factor V Leiden was found in 11.1% of cancer subjects and 24.7% of noncancer subjects. Prothrombin G20210A was found in 3.7% of cancer subjects and 4.1% of noncancer subjects. MTHFR C677T was present in 25.9% of cancer subjects and 58.9% of noncancer subjects. No statistical significance was observed between subjects treated with an antimetabolite and positive for MTHFR C677T compared with those treated with other types of chemotherapy.Conclusion: Analysis of the data collected in this study demonstrated overall higher rates than the expected frequencies of all polymorphism for both the cancer and noncancer patients with documented VTE. In this small retrospective study, the only significant finding was that the MTHFR C677T polymorphism was more prevalent in the noncancer group.Currently, there are no specific guidelines for VTE prevention in the outpatient oncology setting. Identification of risk factors, including prothrombotic mutations may reduce risk of VTE and provide guidance for prophylactic treatment recommendations in the outpatient setting.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Cancer; Factor V Leiden; MTHFR C677T; Prothrombin G20210A; Venous Thromboembolism
Degree Name:
D.N.P.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Nursing; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Moore, Ida (Ki) M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFactor V Leiden, Prothrombin G20210A, and MTHFR C677T Polymorphisms in Cancer Patients with Venous Thromboembolismen_US
dc.creatorLattimore, Lois Eileenen_US
dc.contributor.authorLattimore, Lois Eileenen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIntro/Aims: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common complication in cancer patients. The role of thrombophilic polymorphisms in cancer related VTE remains poorly explored. Aim 1 of this study was to determine if Factor V Leiden (G1691A), Prothrombin (PT) G20210A or methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T are associated with the increased occurrence of VTE in adult oncology subjects compared to nononcology subjects. Aim 2 of this study was to determine if cancer patients with the MTHFR C677T polymorphism who are treated with antimetabolite therapy have an increased incidence of VTE compared to cancer patients who are treated with other chemotherapy.Setting/Methods: A descriptive, comparative, retrospective chart analysis was utilized for this study in an outpatient hematology, oncology clinic in Southern Arizona. Enrolled were 100 adult subjects (age 18 - 85) with documented history of VTE (27 subjects with cancer and 73 noncancer). Subjects were evaluated for Factor V Leiden, PT G20210A, and MTHFR C677T prior to the study. Eleven subjects were treated with antimetabolite chemotherapy and 8 subjects were treated with other chemotherapy.Results: The overall polymorphism frequency for Factor V Leiden was 21%, PT G20210A 4%, and MTHFR C677T 50%. Factor V Leiden was found in 11.1% of cancer subjects and 24.7% of noncancer subjects. Prothrombin G20210A was found in 3.7% of cancer subjects and 4.1% of noncancer subjects. MTHFR C677T was present in 25.9% of cancer subjects and 58.9% of noncancer subjects. No statistical significance was observed between subjects treated with an antimetabolite and positive for MTHFR C677T compared with those treated with other types of chemotherapy.Conclusion: Analysis of the data collected in this study demonstrated overall higher rates than the expected frequencies of all polymorphism for both the cancer and noncancer patients with documented VTE. In this small retrospective study, the only significant finding was that the MTHFR C677T polymorphism was more prevalent in the noncancer group.Currently, there are no specific guidelines for VTE prevention in the outpatient oncology setting. Identification of risk factors, including prothrombotic mutations may reduce risk of VTE and provide guidance for prophylactic treatment recommendations in the outpatient setting.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectCanceren_US
dc.subjectFactor V Leidenen_US
dc.subjectMTHFR C677Ten_US
dc.subjectProthrombin G20210Aen_US
dc.subjectVenous Thromboembolismen_US
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMoore, Ida (Ki) M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMoore, Ida (Ki) M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRitter, Leslieen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGallek, Matthew J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest11265en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752261105en_US
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