NEUROKININ 1 RECEPTORS AND THEIR ROLE IN OPIOID-INDUCED HYPERALGESIA, ANTINOCICEPTIVE TOLERANCE AND REWARD

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193763
Title:
NEUROKININ 1 RECEPTORS AND THEIR ROLE IN OPIOID-INDUCED HYPERALGESIA, ANTINOCICEPTIVE TOLERANCE AND REWARD
Author:
Largent- Milnes, Tally Marie
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Pain is the most common and debilitating sign of a medical problem, with nearly 15 million patients suffering from chronic pain, including neuropathic pain. Widely used therapies for treating neuropathic pain include tri-cyclic antidepressants, opioids, anticonvulsants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents and combinations thereof. Despite the abundance of treatments, the management of chronic pain remains difficult due to an inability for many patients to achieve appropriate pain relief at doses which are tolerable over long periods of time.Opiates (natural products), or opioids (synthetic derivatives), are considered the gold standard of analgesic care, though with little efficacy for neuropathic pain. Opioids are associated with unwanted side effects, including paradoxical pain and abuse liability that may result from several nervous system adaptations within the pain modulating neural network. These dose related side effects become more prevalent as clinicians try to overcome analgesic tolerance.Molecular mechanisms underlying these unwanted side effects have been studied extensively, and the literature purports a variety of contributing factors and neurobiological adaptations. The studies herein describe additional molecular adaptations and novel pharmacological approaches to counteract these changes. First, the contributions of neurobiological remodeling within a single receptor system (the opioid system) were investigated in the spinal dorsal horn after peripheral nerve ligation and chronic exposure to an opioid agonist in combination with an ultra-low-dose of opioid antagonist. The effects of the ultra-low-dose opioid antagonist naltrexone on the efficacy of oxycodone for neuropathic pain were investigated after both central and systemic administration.Secondly, molecular remodeling occurs across different receptor systems in the pain network, including altered regulation of pronociceptive molecules (e.g. substance P; SP). Previous studies have reported that opioid-induced hyperalgesia, tolerance and reward can be prevented by a blockade or ablation of SP activity at the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1). We have characterized single compounds, rationally designed to act as opioid agonists and an NK1 antagonist using in vitro assays and the efficacy in vivo using rodent models of pain, antinociceptive tolerance and reward. Collectively, these studies validate the concept of targeting multiple neurobiological adaptations as a therapeutic option for neuropathic pain and reducing opioid- mediated side effects.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
antinociceptive tolerance; neurokinin; neuropharmacology; opioid induced hyperalgesia; pain; reward
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Medical Pharmacology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Vanderah, Todd W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleNEUROKININ 1 RECEPTORS AND THEIR ROLE IN OPIOID-INDUCED HYPERALGESIA, ANTINOCICEPTIVE TOLERANCE AND REWARDen_US
dc.creatorLargent- Milnes, Tally Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorLargent- Milnes, Tally Marieen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPain is the most common and debilitating sign of a medical problem, with nearly 15 million patients suffering from chronic pain, including neuropathic pain. Widely used therapies for treating neuropathic pain include tri-cyclic antidepressants, opioids, anticonvulsants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents and combinations thereof. Despite the abundance of treatments, the management of chronic pain remains difficult due to an inability for many patients to achieve appropriate pain relief at doses which are tolerable over long periods of time.Opiates (natural products), or opioids (synthetic derivatives), are considered the gold standard of analgesic care, though with little efficacy for neuropathic pain. Opioids are associated with unwanted side effects, including paradoxical pain and abuse liability that may result from several nervous system adaptations within the pain modulating neural network. These dose related side effects become more prevalent as clinicians try to overcome analgesic tolerance.Molecular mechanisms underlying these unwanted side effects have been studied extensively, and the literature purports a variety of contributing factors and neurobiological adaptations. The studies herein describe additional molecular adaptations and novel pharmacological approaches to counteract these changes. First, the contributions of neurobiological remodeling within a single receptor system (the opioid system) were investigated in the spinal dorsal horn after peripheral nerve ligation and chronic exposure to an opioid agonist in combination with an ultra-low-dose of opioid antagonist. The effects of the ultra-low-dose opioid antagonist naltrexone on the efficacy of oxycodone for neuropathic pain were investigated after both central and systemic administration.Secondly, molecular remodeling occurs across different receptor systems in the pain network, including altered regulation of pronociceptive molecules (e.g. substance P; SP). Previous studies have reported that opioid-induced hyperalgesia, tolerance and reward can be prevented by a blockade or ablation of SP activity at the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1). We have characterized single compounds, rationally designed to act as opioid agonists and an NK1 antagonist using in vitro assays and the efficacy in vivo using rodent models of pain, antinociceptive tolerance and reward. Collectively, these studies validate the concept of targeting multiple neurobiological adaptations as a therapeutic option for neuropathic pain and reducing opioid- mediated side effects.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectantinociceptive toleranceen_US
dc.subjectneurokininen_US
dc.subjectneuropharmacologyen_US
dc.subjectopioid induced hyperalgesiaen_US
dc.subjectpainen_US
dc.subjectrewarden_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMedical Pharmacologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairVanderah, Todd W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPorreca, Franken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHruby, Victor J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFrench, Edward D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKing-Deeny, Tamaraen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10899en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753822en_US
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