The Role of Complement in Ischemic Heart Disease in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193747
Title:
The Role of Complement in Ischemic Heart Disease in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Author:
La Bonte, Laura
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The mechanisms responsible for the enhanced inflammatory response in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and its contribution to the severe ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury observed in the T2DM heart are unclear. I/R is associated with an acute inflammatory response recognized by reactive oxidant production, complement activation, and leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion, among others. Complement activation plays an important role in the inflammatory response and is involved in the manifestation of I/R injury in the non-diabetic heart, and is a potent chemoattractant for circulating neutrophils (PMNs). The purpose of this dissertation research was to test the hypothesis that the complement system, predominantly the lectin pathway, is a significant contributor to the excessive response of the Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF), a rat model of T2DM, to myocardial I/R injury. Following 30min of coronary artery occlusion and 120min of reperfusion we measured C3 deposition, PMN accumulation, PMN CD11b expression, and ICAM-1 expression. We found significantly more C3 deposition, PMN accumulation, ICAM-1 and PMN CD11b expression in diabetic samples compared to non-diabetic samples. To elucidate a role for complement system activation, we treated animals with FUT-175, a broad complement inhibitor. In vivo, FUT-175 treatment significantly decreased complement deposition (66%), PMN accumulation (59%), and infarct size (55%) compared to untreated animals in both non-diabetic Sprague-Dawley and diabetic ZDF rats. To specifically examine the role of the lectin pathway, we selectively inhibited rat MBL-A prior to myocardial I/R in ZDF rats. Anti-MBL treatment significantly decreased infarct size, C3 deposition and PMN accumulation in the ZDF post-ischemic left ventricle (LV). Genomic analysis revealed that gene expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-1α was enhanced in the ZDF heart following reperfusion, and quantitative RT-PCR results confirmed IL-6 upregulation. We found significantly increased complement C5a receptor (CD88) expression on diabetic neutrophils prior to ischemia, suggesting that diabetic PMNs are "primed" to respond to complement activation. Taken together, these results provide evidence that 1) the ZDF rat is a good model for chronic inflammation in the setting of T2DM, 2) lectin pathway activation plays a significant role in the inflammatory response to I/R injury in the ZDF heart, and 3) anti-complement therapy may be particularly cardio-protective in T2DM.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Complement; Diabetes; mannose-binding lectin; ischemia/reperfusion injury; inflammation; neutrophil
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Physiological Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
McDonagh, Paul F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Role of Complement in Ischemic Heart Disease in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitusen_US
dc.creatorLa Bonte, Lauraen_US
dc.contributor.authorLa Bonte, Lauraen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe mechanisms responsible for the enhanced inflammatory response in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and its contribution to the severe ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury observed in the T2DM heart are unclear. I/R is associated with an acute inflammatory response recognized by reactive oxidant production, complement activation, and leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion, among others. Complement activation plays an important role in the inflammatory response and is involved in the manifestation of I/R injury in the non-diabetic heart, and is a potent chemoattractant for circulating neutrophils (PMNs). The purpose of this dissertation research was to test the hypothesis that the complement system, predominantly the lectin pathway, is a significant contributor to the excessive response of the Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF), a rat model of T2DM, to myocardial I/R injury. Following 30min of coronary artery occlusion and 120min of reperfusion we measured C3 deposition, PMN accumulation, PMN CD11b expression, and ICAM-1 expression. We found significantly more C3 deposition, PMN accumulation, ICAM-1 and PMN CD11b expression in diabetic samples compared to non-diabetic samples. To elucidate a role for complement system activation, we treated animals with FUT-175, a broad complement inhibitor. In vivo, FUT-175 treatment significantly decreased complement deposition (66%), PMN accumulation (59%), and infarct size (55%) compared to untreated animals in both non-diabetic Sprague-Dawley and diabetic ZDF rats. To specifically examine the role of the lectin pathway, we selectively inhibited rat MBL-A prior to myocardial I/R in ZDF rats. Anti-MBL treatment significantly decreased infarct size, C3 deposition and PMN accumulation in the ZDF post-ischemic left ventricle (LV). Genomic analysis revealed that gene expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-1α was enhanced in the ZDF heart following reperfusion, and quantitative RT-PCR results confirmed IL-6 upregulation. We found significantly increased complement C5a receptor (CD88) expression on diabetic neutrophils prior to ischemia, suggesting that diabetic PMNs are "primed" to respond to complement activation. Taken together, these results provide evidence that 1) the ZDF rat is a good model for chronic inflammation in the setting of T2DM, 2) lectin pathway activation plays a significant role in the inflammatory response to I/R injury in the ZDF heart, and 3) anti-complement therapy may be particularly cardio-protective in T2DM.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectComplementen_US
dc.subjectDiabetesen_US
dc.subjectmannose-binding lectinen_US
dc.subjectischemia/reperfusion injuryen_US
dc.subjectinflammationen_US
dc.subjectneutrophilen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiological Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMcDonagh, Paul F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGore, Robert W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHenriksen, Erik J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRitter, Leslie S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest2651en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749654en_US
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