Contested Meanings about Body, Health, and Weight: Frame Resonance, Strategies of Action, and the Uses of Culture

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193746
Title:
Contested Meanings about Body, Health, and Weight: Frame Resonance, Strategies of Action, and the Uses of Culture
Author:
Kwan, Samantha
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
There has been much talk in the public arena about the meanings of the overweight body. While feminist scholars have long theorized and studied the oppressive effects of hegemonic beauty norms, in recent years several groups such as the Centers for Disease Control, the National Association to Advance Fat Acceptance (a non-profit fat acceptance organization), and the Center for Consumer Freedom (a non-profit organization representing the food industry), have stepped up claims-making about the fat body and what it represents. How are these competing cultural messages promulgated by these cultural producers? Do these messages resonate with individuals? Moreover, how meaningful are these cultural messages in shaping day to day lives?Using content/frame analysis, survey data (n=456), and in-depth qualitative interviews (n=42), my dissertation examines framing competitions and dynamics among four competing cultural frames about the overweight body (the health frame, beauty frame, market choice frame, and social justice frame). I also examine the relationship between these cultural frames and individual agents. Specifically, I look at how respondents use culture by accepting, redefining, and rejecting elements of various frames. In my dissertation, I elaborate on my empirical findings and theoretical developments about health, beauty, individual and corporate responsibility, and social justice; the relationship between culture and agents; policy implications; and directions for future research.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Sociology
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Sociology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Bergesen, Albert; Roth, Louise

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleContested Meanings about Body, Health, and Weight: Frame Resonance, Strategies of Action, and the Uses of Cultureen_US
dc.creatorKwan, Samanthaen_US
dc.contributor.authorKwan, Samanthaen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThere has been much talk in the public arena about the meanings of the overweight body. While feminist scholars have long theorized and studied the oppressive effects of hegemonic beauty norms, in recent years several groups such as the Centers for Disease Control, the National Association to Advance Fat Acceptance (a non-profit fat acceptance organization), and the Center for Consumer Freedom (a non-profit organization representing the food industry), have stepped up claims-making about the fat body and what it represents. How are these competing cultural messages promulgated by these cultural producers? Do these messages resonate with individuals? Moreover, how meaningful are these cultural messages in shaping day to day lives?Using content/frame analysis, survey data (n=456), and in-depth qualitative interviews (n=42), my dissertation examines framing competitions and dynamics among four competing cultural frames about the overweight body (the health frame, beauty frame, market choice frame, and social justice frame). I also examine the relationship between these cultural frames and individual agents. Specifically, I look at how respondents use culture by accepting, redefining, and rejecting elements of various frames. In my dissertation, I elaborate on my empirical findings and theoretical developments about health, beauty, individual and corporate responsibility, and social justice; the relationship between culture and agents; policy implications; and directions for future research.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBergesen, Alberten_US
dc.contributor.chairRoth, Louiseen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChaves, Marken_US
dc.identifier.proquest2235en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747406en_US
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