Beliefs Regarding Confidentiality Amongst Parents and Children Receiving Counseling Through A School-Based Mental Health Clinic

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193727
Title:
Beliefs Regarding Confidentiality Amongst Parents and Children Receiving Counseling Through A School-Based Mental Health Clinic
Author:
Krivda, Lynn Ann
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Fifty-one children between the ages of 6 and 12, receiving school counseling through a school-based mental health clinic, were administered a questionnaire designed to assess their beliefs about confidentiality in the therapeutic relationship. Each child's parent was also administered a parallel version of the questionnaire. Children's beliefs were then compared to parent's beliefs regarding the issue of confidentiality in school-based counseling. The questionnaires were developed based on the American Psychological Association's Ethical Principles and Code of Conduct (2002) and included items from the subarea of Principle 4, Privacy and Confidentiality. A significant main effect (p < .05) for child respondent group versus parent respondent group was demonstrated with the parent group scoring significantly higher in ethical beliefs regarding confidentiality in counseling in a school-based mental health clinic. Additional statistical analyses comparing confidentiality beliefs by ethnicity (Hispanic families versus Caucasian families) and child's gender found no significant main effects (p > .05). The initial hypothesis that children did not differ from their parents in their respective beliefs concerning confidentiality in school-based counseling was rejected. The results suggested that parents demonstrated more of an understanding of confidentiality that was consistent with professional ethical guidelines than did their respective children. The results are discussed in terms of confidentiality in a therapeutic relationship and children's perception of the maintenance of such confidentiality and trust in school-based counseling. Future directions for research and the limitations of the current study are also discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Educational Psychology
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Morris, Richard J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleBeliefs Regarding Confidentiality Amongst Parents and Children Receiving Counseling Through A School-Based Mental Health Clinicen_US
dc.creatorKrivda, Lynn Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorKrivda, Lynn Annen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFifty-one children between the ages of 6 and 12, receiving school counseling through a school-based mental health clinic, were administered a questionnaire designed to assess their beliefs about confidentiality in the therapeutic relationship. Each child's parent was also administered a parallel version of the questionnaire. Children's beliefs were then compared to parent's beliefs regarding the issue of confidentiality in school-based counseling. The questionnaires were developed based on the American Psychological Association's Ethical Principles and Code of Conduct (2002) and included items from the subarea of Principle 4, Privacy and Confidentiality. A significant main effect (p < .05) for child respondent group versus parent respondent group was demonstrated with the parent group scoring significantly higher in ethical beliefs regarding confidentiality in counseling in a school-based mental health clinic. Additional statistical analyses comparing confidentiality beliefs by ethnicity (Hispanic families versus Caucasian families) and child's gender found no significant main effects (p > .05). The initial hypothesis that children did not differ from their parents in their respective beliefs concerning confidentiality in school-based counseling was rejected. The results suggested that parents demonstrated more of an understanding of confidentiality that was consistent with professional ethical guidelines than did their respective children. The results are discussed in terms of confidentiality in a therapeutic relationship and children's perception of the maintenance of such confidentiality and trust in school-based counseling. Future directions for research and the limitations of the current study are also discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMorris, Richard J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberObrzut, John E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAleamoni, Lawrence M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1298en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137354891en_US
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