Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193714
Title:
Terpene Synthases in Ginger and Turmeric
Author:
KOO, HYUN JO
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.) and turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) produce important pharmacologically active metabolites at high levels, which include terpenoids and polyketides such as curcumin and gingerols. This dissertation describes the terpenoids produced by ginger and turmeric, candidate ESTs for terpene synthases, and the cloning and expression of several terpene synthases. A comparison of metabolite profiles, microarray results and EST data enable us to predict which terpene synthases are related with the production of specific terpenoids. Analysis of EST data further suggests several genes important for the growth and development of rhizomes. Ginger and turmeric accumulate important pharmacologically active metabolites at high levels in their rhizomes. Comparisons of ginger and turmeric EST data to publicly available sorghum rhizome ESTs revealed a total of 777 contigs common to ginger, turmeric and sorghum rhizomes but absent from other tissues. The list of rhizome-specific contigs was enriched for genes associated with regulation of tissue growth, development, and regulation of transcription. The analysis suggests ethylene response factors, AUX/IAA proteins, and rhizome-enriched MADS box transcription factors may play important roles in defining rhizome growth and development. From ginger and turmeric, 25 mono- and 16 sesquiterpene synthase sequences were cloned and the function of 13 mono- and 11 sesquiterpene synthases were revealed. There are many paralogs in the ginger and turmeric terpene synthase family, some of which have the same or similar function. However some paralogs have diverse functions and this suggests the evolution of terpene synthases in ginger and turmeric. Importantly, α-zingiberene/β-sesquiphellandrene synthase was identified, which makes the substrates for α-turmerone and β-turmerone production in turmeric. Also P450 candidates for α- zingiberene/β-sesquiphellandrene oxidase are proposed. Research involving analysis of metabolite profiles requires the manipulation of a large datasets, such as those produced by GC/MS. We developed an approach to identify compounds that involves deconvolution of peaks obtained using SICs as well as common peak selections between samples even though the peaks may be very small and represent unknown compounds. The limitation of this approach occurs when there are huge peaks in the samples, which distort the SIC of small embedded peaks and sometimes their own SICs.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
alpha-zingiberene; beta-sesquiphellandrene; ginger; terpene; turmeric; turmerone
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Plant Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Gang, David R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleTerpene Synthases in Ginger and Turmericen_US
dc.creatorKOO, HYUN JOen_US
dc.contributor.authorKOO, HYUN JOen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractGinger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.) and turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) produce important pharmacologically active metabolites at high levels, which include terpenoids and polyketides such as curcumin and gingerols. This dissertation describes the terpenoids produced by ginger and turmeric, candidate ESTs for terpene synthases, and the cloning and expression of several terpene synthases. A comparison of metabolite profiles, microarray results and EST data enable us to predict which terpene synthases are related with the production of specific terpenoids. Analysis of EST data further suggests several genes important for the growth and development of rhizomes. Ginger and turmeric accumulate important pharmacologically active metabolites at high levels in their rhizomes. Comparisons of ginger and turmeric EST data to publicly available sorghum rhizome ESTs revealed a total of 777 contigs common to ginger, turmeric and sorghum rhizomes but absent from other tissues. The list of rhizome-specific contigs was enriched for genes associated with regulation of tissue growth, development, and regulation of transcription. The analysis suggests ethylene response factors, AUX/IAA proteins, and rhizome-enriched MADS box transcription factors may play important roles in defining rhizome growth and development. From ginger and turmeric, 25 mono- and 16 sesquiterpene synthase sequences were cloned and the function of 13 mono- and 11 sesquiterpene synthases were revealed. There are many paralogs in the ginger and turmeric terpene synthase family, some of which have the same or similar function. However some paralogs have diverse functions and this suggests the evolution of terpene synthases in ginger and turmeric. Importantly, α-zingiberene/β-sesquiphellandrene synthase was identified, which makes the substrates for α-turmerone and β-turmerone production in turmeric. Also P450 candidates for α- zingiberene/β-sesquiphellandrene oxidase are proposed. Research involving analysis of metabolite profiles requires the manipulation of a large datasets, such as those produced by GC/MS. We developed an approach to identify compounds that involves deconvolution of peaks obtained using SICs as well as common peak selections between samples even though the peaks may be very small and represent unknown compounds. The limitation of this approach occurs when there are huge peaks in the samples, which distort the SIC of small embedded peaks and sometimes their own SICs.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectalpha-zingibereneen_US
dc.subjectbeta-sesquiphellandreneen_US
dc.subjectgingeren_US
dc.subjectterpeneen_US
dc.subjectturmericen_US
dc.subjectturmeroneen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairGang, David R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVanEtten, Hans D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGalbraith, David W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBandarian, Vaheen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVierling, Elizabethen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10653en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753389en_US
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