Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193683
Title:
Design and Development of a Ranging-Imaging Spectrometer
Author:
Kinder, Brian
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The topic of the dissertation is the design and development of an imaging spectrometer that is capable of simultaneously measuring range. The instrument developed, called the Ranging-Imaging Spectrometer (RIS), is a marriage of two well-established technologies. The technologies are the Computed Tomographic Imaging Spectrometer (CTIS) and the Scannerless Range Imaging Laser Detection and Ranging instrument (SRI LADAR) developed at The University of Arizona and Sandia National Labs respectively. The instrument is the first of it kind with its ability to simultaneously detect passive reflectance spectra and active range detection on a single focal plane array without spatial scanning. This RIS has applications in military reconnaissance, mining, surveying, robotic vision, and autonomous vehicle navigation. The instrument has 77 x 77 pixels of spatial resolution, 61 spectral samples from 597 - 897 nm with Δλ = 5nm, and range resolution of 8.92 ± 1.23 cm. The topic of the dissertation is first motivated by discussing current technologies and their related drawbacks that provide reasons for developing the RIS. A basic review of imaging spectrometry, CTIS, and SRI LADAR are presented as foundations on which the instrument is constructed. Technical data is then presented including: the design of the CTIS components, the opto-mechanical design for mounting and mating the two systems together, the spectral and range calibration techniques, the analysis of the spectral and range resolutions and tests, and a section on range errors and correction techniques. A section detailing range noise suppression techniques using statistics is included along with future work.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Optical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dereniak, Eustace L
Committee Chair:
Dereniak, Eustace L

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleDesign and Development of a Ranging-Imaging Spectrometeren_US
dc.creatorKinder, Brianen_US
dc.contributor.authorKinder, Brianen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe topic of the dissertation is the design and development of an imaging spectrometer that is capable of simultaneously measuring range. The instrument developed, called the Ranging-Imaging Spectrometer (RIS), is a marriage of two well-established technologies. The technologies are the Computed Tomographic Imaging Spectrometer (CTIS) and the Scannerless Range Imaging Laser Detection and Ranging instrument (SRI LADAR) developed at The University of Arizona and Sandia National Labs respectively. The instrument is the first of it kind with its ability to simultaneously detect passive reflectance spectra and active range detection on a single focal plane array without spatial scanning. This RIS has applications in military reconnaissance, mining, surveying, robotic vision, and autonomous vehicle navigation. The instrument has 77 x 77 pixels of spatial resolution, 61 spectral samples from 597 - 897 nm with Δλ = 5nm, and range resolution of 8.92 ± 1.23 cm. The topic of the dissertation is first motivated by discussing current technologies and their related drawbacks that provide reasons for developing the RIS. A basic review of imaging spectrometry, CTIS, and SRI LADAR are presented as foundations on which the instrument is constructed. Technical data is then presented including: the design of the CTIS components, the opto-mechanical design for mounting and mating the two systems together, the spectral and range calibration techniques, the analysis of the spectral and range resolutions and tests, and a section on range errors and correction techniques. A section detailing range noise suppression techniques using statistics is included along with future work.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDereniak, Eustace Len_US
dc.contributor.chairDereniak, Eustace Len_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReagan, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSmithpeter, Colinen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1248en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137354608en_US
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