Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193654
Title:
Pathways to Substance Use Among Sexually Abused Girls
Author:
Bailey, Jennifer Ann
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study aimed to 1) replicate existing research linking childhood sexual abuse and later substance use, 2) identify intergenerational parallels between the substance use and sexual victimization experiences of adolescent girls and their mothers, and 3) evaluate early pubertal timing, depressive self-concept, and behavioral under-control as potential pathways to substance use for sexually abused girls. Data were drawn from 150 mother-daughter pairs participating in a longitudinal study of the impact of domestic violence on the lives of women and children. Structural equations modeling revealed that girls' childhood sexual abuse was associated prospectively with their later substance use. This relationship held (retrospectively) for mothers as well. Mothers' risk for sexual abuse and substance use was transmitted to their daughters. Early pubertal timing, depressive self-concept, and behavioral under-control among girls were all predicted by childhood sexual abuse. Only behavioral under-control was, in turn, related to adolescent substance use. Depressive self-concept contributed to behavioral under-control among girls. A series of hierarchical regressions revealed that these relationships persist when controls for co-occurring forms of child abuse (physical, exposure to domestic violence) are included. Implications and limitations of the study as well as directions for future research are discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
sexual abuse; substance use; behavioral undercontrol
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
McCloskey, Laura A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titlePathways to Substance Use Among Sexually Abused Girlsen_US
dc.creatorBailey, Jennifer Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorBailey, Jennifer Annen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study aimed to 1) replicate existing research linking childhood sexual abuse and later substance use, 2) identify intergenerational parallels between the substance use and sexual victimization experiences of adolescent girls and their mothers, and 3) evaluate early pubertal timing, depressive self-concept, and behavioral under-control as potential pathways to substance use for sexually abused girls. Data were drawn from 150 mother-daughter pairs participating in a longitudinal study of the impact of domestic violence on the lives of women and children. Structural equations modeling revealed that girls' childhood sexual abuse was associated prospectively with their later substance use. This relationship held (retrospectively) for mothers as well. Mothers' risk for sexual abuse and substance use was transmitted to their daughters. Early pubertal timing, depressive self-concept, and behavioral under-control among girls were all predicted by childhood sexual abuse. Only behavioral under-control was, in turn, related to adolescent substance use. Depressive self-concept contributed to behavioral under-control among girls. A series of hierarchical regressions revealed that these relationships persist when controls for co-occurring forms of child abuse (physical, exposure to domestic violence) are included. Implications and limitations of the study as well as directions for future research are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectsexual abuseen_US
dc.subjectsubstance useen_US
dc.subjectbehavioral undercontrolen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMcCloskey, Laura A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSechrest, Leeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBootzin, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBecker, Judithen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLevesque, Rogeren_US
dc.identifier.proquest2375en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748267en_US
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