Leaching from High Capacity Arsenic-Bearing Solid Residuals under Landfill Conditions

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193650
Title:
Leaching from High Capacity Arsenic-Bearing Solid Residuals under Landfill Conditions
Author:
Keshta, Mohammed A.
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Arsenic is a naturally occurring contaminant in ground water. The link between human exposure to elevated levels of arsenic and the increase in cancerous and non-cancerous diseases is well documented. Consequently, arsenic removal from drinking water has been thoroughly investigated.Lowering the maximum contaminant limit of arsenic (from 50 to 10 ppb) will burden small water utilities, who either lack the financial or technical ability to comply. Adsorption onto solid media has been one of the most attractive options for small water utilities (EPA, 2001), but this process generates huge amounts of arsenic bearing solid residuals (ABSRs) complicating further this matter.Numerous studies have suggested that the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP) does not properly reflect the actual leaching behavior of ASBRs under landfills (Ghosh et al., 2004). This work focuses on testing different arsenic iron- oxide and non- iron- based sorbents, likely to be used for arsenic removal, and assessing the long term behavior of these sorbents under landfill conditions. Our results indicate that microbial processes play a major role in the mobilization of As from granular ferric hydroxide (GFH). Long term operation of GFH sorbent showed that Fe (III) was reduced to Fe(II) and As(V) was reduced to As(III) under anaerobic/reducing conditions. Under semi batch landfill simulation experiments, our results show that non iron based media leached arsenic above the Toxicity Characteristics limit (TC) and it was observed that sorbate (As) might leach at a faster rate than the sorbent itself. It is thought that arsenic mobilization from iron-based sorbent occurs mostly due to iron reduction and its subsequent dissolution. However, measured arsenic leaching rates from the sorbents used in this study are comparable with that of the ferric hydroxide media, which indicates that the mechanism of arsenic mobilization might be independent of the possible dissolution of the sorbent. Despite the fact that non- iron based media may have a higher arsenic adsorption capacity, they leach arsenic at a higher rate than iron based media under our simulated landfill conditions.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Arsenic; Iron reduction; landfill; leachate; microbial; Sorbent
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Chemical Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ela, Wendell; Saez, Eduardo

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleLeaching from High Capacity Arsenic-Bearing Solid Residuals under Landfill Conditionsen_US
dc.creatorKeshta, Mohammed A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKeshta, Mohammed A.en_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractArsenic is a naturally occurring contaminant in ground water. The link between human exposure to elevated levels of arsenic and the increase in cancerous and non-cancerous diseases is well documented. Consequently, arsenic removal from drinking water has been thoroughly investigated.Lowering the maximum contaminant limit of arsenic (from 50 to 10 ppb) will burden small water utilities, who either lack the financial or technical ability to comply. Adsorption onto solid media has been one of the most attractive options for small water utilities (EPA, 2001), but this process generates huge amounts of arsenic bearing solid residuals (ABSRs) complicating further this matter.Numerous studies have suggested that the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP) does not properly reflect the actual leaching behavior of ASBRs under landfills (Ghosh et al., 2004). This work focuses on testing different arsenic iron- oxide and non- iron- based sorbents, likely to be used for arsenic removal, and assessing the long term behavior of these sorbents under landfill conditions. Our results indicate that microbial processes play a major role in the mobilization of As from granular ferric hydroxide (GFH). Long term operation of GFH sorbent showed that Fe (III) was reduced to Fe(II) and As(V) was reduced to As(III) under anaerobic/reducing conditions. Under semi batch landfill simulation experiments, our results show that non iron based media leached arsenic above the Toxicity Characteristics limit (TC) and it was observed that sorbate (As) might leach at a faster rate than the sorbent itself. It is thought that arsenic mobilization from iron-based sorbent occurs mostly due to iron reduction and its subsequent dissolution. However, measured arsenic leaching rates from the sorbents used in this study are comparable with that of the ferric hydroxide media, which indicates that the mechanism of arsenic mobilization might be independent of the possible dissolution of the sorbent. Despite the fact that non- iron based media may have a higher arsenic adsorption capacity, they leach arsenic at a higher rate than iron based media under our simulated landfill conditions.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectArsenicen_US
dc.subjectIron reductionen_US
dc.subjectlandfillen_US
dc.subjectleachateen_US
dc.subjectmicrobialen_US
dc.subjectSorbenten_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorEla, Wendellen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSaez, Eduardoen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEla, Wendellen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSaez, Eduardoen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberField, Jamesen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10559en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659752295en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.