Geriatric Education Centers and the Academic Capitalist Knowledge/Learning Regime

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193645
Title:
Geriatric Education Centers and the Academic Capitalist Knowledge/Learning Regime
Author:
Kennedy, Teri Knutson
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Geriatric Education Centers (GECs), as funded by the Health Resources and Services Administration, promote interdisciplinary geriatric education and training for more than 35 health-professions disciplines including medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, nursing, and social work. GECs are charged with becoming self-sustaining beyond the period of their funding. Sustainability in this application means that a GEC can fund itself through the generation of multiple revenue sources. This study seeks to explore changes in the structure, activities, and relationships of GECs over time in their pursuit of sustainability, and hypothesizes that GECs have shifted from the old economy, or the public good knowledge regime, to the new economy, or the academic capitalist knowledge/learning regime, and from the manufacturing to the networking economy. The theoretical framework of academic capitalism and the knowledge/learning regime will be used as a lens in this qualitative multiple case study.Sources included structured, in-depth, on-site interviews and observations, as well as documentary and virtual (website) evidence. While GECs are engaging in market-like behaviors, creating markets and circuits of knowledge, developing interstitial and intermediary organizations, and expanding managerial capacity, they have been unable to connect with related markets, as these markets lack a profit motive, and have ultimately been unsuccessful in their pursuit of sustainability. Continued federal funding for GECs is justified based on the public good argument that without public encouragement, these services would not be provided by the private sector. The study concludes with recommendations to enhance opportunity structures for GECs.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
academic capitalism; Geriatric Education Centers; geriatrics; gerontology; health professions; health education
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rhoades, Gary; Slaughter, Sheila
Committee Chair:
Rhoades, Gary

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleGeriatric Education Centers and the Academic Capitalist Knowledge/Learning Regimeen_US
dc.creatorKennedy, Teri Knutsonen_US
dc.contributor.authorKennedy, Teri Knutsonen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractGeriatric Education Centers (GECs), as funded by the Health Resources and Services Administration, promote interdisciplinary geriatric education and training for more than 35 health-professions disciplines including medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, nursing, and social work. GECs are charged with becoming self-sustaining beyond the period of their funding. Sustainability in this application means that a GEC can fund itself through the generation of multiple revenue sources. This study seeks to explore changes in the structure, activities, and relationships of GECs over time in their pursuit of sustainability, and hypothesizes that GECs have shifted from the old economy, or the public good knowledge regime, to the new economy, or the academic capitalist knowledge/learning regime, and from the manufacturing to the networking economy. The theoretical framework of academic capitalism and the knowledge/learning regime will be used as a lens in this qualitative multiple case study.Sources included structured, in-depth, on-site interviews and observations, as well as documentary and virtual (website) evidence. While GECs are engaging in market-like behaviors, creating markets and circuits of knowledge, developing interstitial and intermediary organizations, and expanding managerial capacity, they have been unable to connect with related markets, as these markets lack a profit motive, and have ultimately been unsuccessful in their pursuit of sustainability. Continued federal funding for GECs is justified based on the public good argument that without public encouragement, these services would not be provided by the private sector. The study concludes with recommendations to enhance opportunity structures for GECs.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectacademic capitalismen_US
dc.subjectGeriatric Education Centersen_US
dc.subjectgeriatricsen_US
dc.subjectgerontologyen_US
dc.subjecthealth professionsen_US
dc.subjecthealth educationen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRhoades, Garyen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSlaughter, Sheilaen_US
dc.contributor.chairRhoades, Garyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSlaughter, Sheilaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCheslock, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPhillips, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTompkins, Catherineen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2741en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749766en_US
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