Reasserting The Prominence Of Pedagogy In The Technology-Enhanced Learning Environment

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193628
Title:
Reasserting The Prominence Of Pedagogy In The Technology-Enhanced Learning Environment
Author:
Keers, Fred
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
As universities transition from instructor-driven to student-centered learning environments, the institutional learning structure is being redesigned to emphasize active learning. Instructional technologies, employing active learning models, have been a critical component in the redesign. The active learning model suggests that the student engages in various activities, and uses various strategies, to gather information and achieve understanding. Technology-driven learning environments therefore often instill activities that direct the student's learning. Use of on-line technologies, such as the Internet, is one method for creating active learning activities that direct the student's learning. This experiment explores how active learning activities, specifically how a student engages in research by accessing on-line information, affects their understanding of the material. The experiment is a 2 (Task Complexity) x 2 (Data Resource) design testing a student's (N=194) ability to synthesize information as they traversed through a specified set of resources. The findings indicate that students who access topic-specific resources engage in more research activities than students who access broad-topic resources. Furthermore, the findings indicate that students who access topic-specific resources will synthesize the relevant material into a more clear and concise response than students who access broad-topic resources. Suggestions and further research are posited to further understand how instructors can engage use of on-line resources, specifically the Internet, and instructional technologies, such as Distance Learning, to facilitate student learning.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Technology-Driven Learning; Student-centered Learning; Active Learning with On-line Technology
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Management Information Systems; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Weisband, Suzanne P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleReasserting The Prominence Of Pedagogy In The Technology-Enhanced Learning Environmenten_US
dc.creatorKeers, Freden_US
dc.contributor.authorKeers, Freden_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAs universities transition from instructor-driven to student-centered learning environments, the institutional learning structure is being redesigned to emphasize active learning. Instructional technologies, employing active learning models, have been a critical component in the redesign. The active learning model suggests that the student engages in various activities, and uses various strategies, to gather information and achieve understanding. Technology-driven learning environments therefore often instill activities that direct the student's learning. Use of on-line technologies, such as the Internet, is one method for creating active learning activities that direct the student's learning. This experiment explores how active learning activities, specifically how a student engages in research by accessing on-line information, affects their understanding of the material. The experiment is a 2 (Task Complexity) x 2 (Data Resource) design testing a student's (N=194) ability to synthesize information as they traversed through a specified set of resources. The findings indicate that students who access topic-specific resources engage in more research activities than students who access broad-topic resources. Furthermore, the findings indicate that students who access topic-specific resources will synthesize the relevant material into a more clear and concise response than students who access broad-topic resources. Suggestions and further research are posited to further understand how instructors can engage use of on-line resources, specifically the Internet, and instructional technologies, such as Distance Learning, to facilitate student learning.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectTechnology-Driven Learningen_US
dc.subjectStudent-centered Learningen_US
dc.subjectActive Learning with On-line Technologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineManagement Information Systemsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairWeisband, Suzanne P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWeisband, Suzanne P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMeader, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBernardi, Danielen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1816en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747574en_US
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