EMOTIONS AND THE PSYCHOLOGY OF SOCIAL CHESS: HOW OTHERS' INCIDENTAL AFFECT CAN SHAPE EXPECTATIONS AND STRATEGIC BEHAVIOR

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193623
Title:
EMOTIONS AND THE PSYCHOLOGY OF SOCIAL CHESS: HOW OTHERS' INCIDENTAL AFFECT CAN SHAPE EXPECTATIONS AND STRATEGIC BEHAVIOR
Author:
Kausel, Edgar E.
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Researchers have increasingly directed attention to the importance of emotions in decision making. Recent theories have focused on the interpersonal effects of emotions--the influence of the decision maker's expressed emotions on observers' decisions and judgments. In the current research, we examine people's expectations of how incidental, discrete emotions affect behavior. We also study how these expectations affect decisions in interactive settings, and contrast them with how emotions actually impact other people's behavior.These ideas were tested in four studies. In Study 1a, participants (N = 58) answered a questionnaire asking their perceptions of how different emotions affect behavior. In Study 1b, participants (N = 203) read a number of hypothetical scenarios in which different interactions between them and another person took place. Studies 2 (N = 98) and 3 (N = 132) were two economic games -- a Stag-Hunt game and a Trust Game -- involving decisions with non-trivial financial consequences.Across these four studies, I found that people do have strong beliefs about how incidental emotions affect behaviors. Because of these beliefs, when told about their counterparts' emotional state, people in interactive settings modify their behavior. The impact of people's beliefs on behavior, however, was more consistent for negative emotions such as anger and fear, than for positive emotions such as happiness and gratitude. These findings also indicate that people are sensitive to the different effects of different emotions: different negative emotions such as guilt and anger have different effects on their expectations. Finally, I found that people's expectations about how their counterparts' emotions affect behavior can be inaccurate in specific settings.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Behavioral Economics; Emotions; Interactive Decision Making; Judgment and Decision Making; Lay Theories; Strategic Decision Making
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Management; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Connolly, Terence
Committee Chair:
Connolly, Terence

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleEMOTIONS AND THE PSYCHOLOGY OF SOCIAL CHESS: HOW OTHERS' INCIDENTAL AFFECT CAN SHAPE EXPECTATIONS AND STRATEGIC BEHAVIORen_US
dc.creatorKausel, Edgar E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKausel, Edgar E.en_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractResearchers have increasingly directed attention to the importance of emotions in decision making. Recent theories have focused on the interpersonal effects of emotions--the influence of the decision maker's expressed emotions on observers' decisions and judgments. In the current research, we examine people's expectations of how incidental, discrete emotions affect behavior. We also study how these expectations affect decisions in interactive settings, and contrast them with how emotions actually impact other people's behavior.These ideas were tested in four studies. In Study 1a, participants (N = 58) answered a questionnaire asking their perceptions of how different emotions affect behavior. In Study 1b, participants (N = 203) read a number of hypothetical scenarios in which different interactions between them and another person took place. Studies 2 (N = 98) and 3 (N = 132) were two economic games -- a Stag-Hunt game and a Trust Game -- involving decisions with non-trivial financial consequences.Across these four studies, I found that people do have strong beliefs about how incidental emotions affect behaviors. Because of these beliefs, when told about their counterparts' emotional state, people in interactive settings modify their behavior. The impact of people's beliefs on behavior, however, was more consistent for negative emotions such as anger and fear, than for positive emotions such as happiness and gratitude. These findings also indicate that people are sensitive to the different effects of different emotions: different negative emotions such as guilt and anger have different effects on their expectations. Finally, I found that people's expectations about how their counterparts' emotions affect behavior can be inaccurate in specific settings.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectBehavioral Economicsen_US
dc.subjectEmotionsen_US
dc.subjectInteractive Decision Makingen_US
dc.subjectJudgment and Decision Makingen_US
dc.subjectLay Theoriesen_US
dc.subjectStrategic Decision Makingen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineManagementen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorConnolly, Terenceen_US
dc.contributor.chairConnolly, Terenceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberConnolly, Terenceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKugler, Tamaren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOrdóñez, Lisa D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest11091en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659755028en_US
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