LAND SURFACE PHENOLOGICAL RESPONSES TO LAND USE AND CLIMATE VARIATION IN A CHANGING CENTRAL ASIA

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193619
Title:
LAND SURFACE PHENOLOGICAL RESPONSES TO LAND USE AND CLIMATE VARIATION IN A CHANGING CENTRAL ASIA
Author:
Kariyeva, Jahan
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
During the last few decades Central Asia has experienced widespread changes in land cover and land use following the socio-economic and institutional transformations of the region catalyzed by the USSR collapse in 1991. The decade-long drought events and steadily increasing temperature regimes in the region came on top of these institutional transformations, affecting the long term and landscape scale vegetation responses. This research is based on the need to better understand the potential ecological and policy implications of climate variation and land use practices in the contexts of landscape-scale changes dynamics and variability patterns of land surface phenology responses in Central Asia. The land surface phenology responses - the spatio-temporal dynamics of terrestrial vegetation derived from the remotely sensed data - provide measurements linked to the timing of vegetation growth cycles (e.g., start of growing season) and total vegetation productivity over the growing season, which are used as a proxy for the assessment of effects of variations in environmental settings. Local and regional scale assessment of the before and after the USSR collapse vegetation response patterns in the natural and agricultural systems of the Central Asian drylands was conducted to characterize newly emerging links (since 1991) between coupled human and natural systems, e.g., socio-economic and policy drivers of altered land and water use and distribution patterns. Spatio-temporal patterns of bioclimatic responses were examined to determine how phenology is associated with temperature and precipitation in different land use types, including rainfed and irrigated agricultural types. Phenological models were developed to examine relationship between environmental drivers and effect of their altitudinal and latitudinal gradients on the broad-scale vegetation response patterns in non-cropland ecosystems of the desert, steppe, and mountainous regional landscapes of Central Asia.The study results demonstrated that the satellite derived measurements of temporal cycles of vegetation greenness and productivity data was a valuable bioclimatic integrator of climatic and land use variation in Central Asia. The synthesis of broad-scale phenological changes in Central Asia showed that linkages of natural and human systems vary across space and time comprising complex and tightly integrated patterns and processes that are not evident when studied separately.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Central Asia; Land Use; Phenology; Socio-economic Changes; USSR Collapse
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Geography; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
van Leeuwen, Willem J.D.
Committee Chair:
van Leeuwen, Willem J.D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleLAND SURFACE PHENOLOGICAL RESPONSES TO LAND USE AND CLIMATE VARIATION IN A CHANGING CENTRAL ASIAen_US
dc.creatorKariyeva, Jahanen_US
dc.contributor.authorKariyeva, Jahanen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDuring the last few decades Central Asia has experienced widespread changes in land cover and land use following the socio-economic and institutional transformations of the region catalyzed by the USSR collapse in 1991. The decade-long drought events and steadily increasing temperature regimes in the region came on top of these institutional transformations, affecting the long term and landscape scale vegetation responses. This research is based on the need to better understand the potential ecological and policy implications of climate variation and land use practices in the contexts of landscape-scale changes dynamics and variability patterns of land surface phenology responses in Central Asia. The land surface phenology responses - the spatio-temporal dynamics of terrestrial vegetation derived from the remotely sensed data - provide measurements linked to the timing of vegetation growth cycles (e.g., start of growing season) and total vegetation productivity over the growing season, which are used as a proxy for the assessment of effects of variations in environmental settings. Local and regional scale assessment of the before and after the USSR collapse vegetation response patterns in the natural and agricultural systems of the Central Asian drylands was conducted to characterize newly emerging links (since 1991) between coupled human and natural systems, e.g., socio-economic and policy drivers of altered land and water use and distribution patterns. Spatio-temporal patterns of bioclimatic responses were examined to determine how phenology is associated with temperature and precipitation in different land use types, including rainfed and irrigated agricultural types. Phenological models were developed to examine relationship between environmental drivers and effect of their altitudinal and latitudinal gradients on the broad-scale vegetation response patterns in non-cropland ecosystems of the desert, steppe, and mountainous regional landscapes of Central Asia.The study results demonstrated that the satellite derived measurements of temporal cycles of vegetation greenness and productivity data was a valuable bioclimatic integrator of climatic and land use variation in Central Asia. The synthesis of broad-scale phenological changes in Central Asia showed that linkages of natural and human systems vary across space and time comprising complex and tightly integrated patterns and processes that are not evident when studied separately.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectCentral Asiaen_US
dc.subjectLand Useen_US
dc.subjectPhenologyen_US
dc.subjectSocio-economic Changesen_US
dc.subjectUSSR Collapseen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorvan Leeuwen, Willem J.D.en_US
dc.contributor.chairvan Leeuwen, Willem J.D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeemembervan Leeuwen, Willem J. D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMarsh, Stuart E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWoodhouse, Connieen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberYool, Stephen R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10948en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659754862en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.