Ultrathin Single and Multi-Channel Fiberscopes for Biomedical Imaging

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193617
Title:
Ultrathin Single and Multi-Channel Fiberscopes for Biomedical Imaging
Author:
Kano, Angelique Lynn
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Ultrathin fiberscopes typically have an imaging channel and an illumination channeland are available in diameters ranging from 0.5 mm to 2.5 mm. The minimum diam-eter can be reduced by combining the illumination and imaging paths into a singlefiberoptic channel. Constructing a single channel fiberscope requires a technique ofilluminating the tissue, while minimizing the Fresnel reflections and scatter withinthe common illumination and detection channel.A single channel fiberscope should image diffusely reflected light from tissue illu-minated with light filtered for the visible wavelength range (450 - 650 nm). Simplycombining the illumination and collection paths via a beamsplitter results in a lowobject to background signal ratio. The low contrast image is due to a low collectionefficiency of light from the ob ject as well as a high background signal from the Fresnelreflection at the proximal surface of the fiber bundle, where the illumination enters thefiber bundle. The focus of the dissertation is the investigation of methods to reducethe background signal from the proximal surface of the fiber bundle. Three systemswere tested. The first system uses a coherent fiber bundle with an AR-coating on theproximal face. The second system incorporates crossed polarizers into the light path.In addition, a technique was developed, whereby a portion of the image numericalaperture is devoted to illumination and a portion to image signal detection. Thistechnique is called numerical aperture sharing (NA sharing).This dissertation presents the design, construction, testing, and comparison ofthe three single channel fiberscopes. In addition, preliminary results of a study aimedat the usefulness of broadband diffuse reflectance imaging for the identification andtracking of disease progression in mouse esophagus are presented.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
biomedical; coherent fiber bundle; diffuse reflectance; mouse esophagus; single channel; ultrathin fiberscope
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Optical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gmitro, Arthur F.
Committee Chair:
Gmitro, Arthur F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleUltrathin Single and Multi-Channel Fiberscopes for Biomedical Imagingen_US
dc.creatorKano, Angelique Lynnen_US
dc.contributor.authorKano, Angelique Lynnen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractUltrathin fiberscopes typically have an imaging channel and an illumination channeland are available in diameters ranging from 0.5 mm to 2.5 mm. The minimum diam-eter can be reduced by combining the illumination and imaging paths into a singlefiberoptic channel. Constructing a single channel fiberscope requires a technique ofilluminating the tissue, while minimizing the Fresnel reflections and scatter withinthe common illumination and detection channel.A single channel fiberscope should image diffusely reflected light from tissue illu-minated with light filtered for the visible wavelength range (450 - 650 nm). Simplycombining the illumination and collection paths via a beamsplitter results in a lowobject to background signal ratio. The low contrast image is due to a low collectionefficiency of light from the ob ject as well as a high background signal from the Fresnelreflection at the proximal surface of the fiber bundle, where the illumination enters thefiber bundle. The focus of the dissertation is the investigation of methods to reducethe background signal from the proximal surface of the fiber bundle. Three systemswere tested. The first system uses a coherent fiber bundle with an AR-coating on theproximal face. The second system incorporates crossed polarizers into the light path.In addition, a technique was developed, whereby a portion of the image numericalaperture is devoted to illumination and a portion to image signal detection. Thistechnique is called numerical aperture sharing (NA sharing).This dissertation presents the design, construction, testing, and comparison ofthe three single channel fiberscopes. In addition, preliminary results of a study aimedat the usefulness of broadband diffuse reflectance imaging for the identification andtracking of disease progression in mouse esophagus are presented.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectbiomedicalen_US
dc.subjectcoherent fiber bundleen_US
dc.subjectdiffuse reflectanceen_US
dc.subjectmouse esophagusen_US
dc.subjectsingle channelen_US
dc.subjectultrathin fiberscopeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGmitro, Arthur F.en_US
dc.contributor.chairGmitro, Arthur F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberUtzinger, Ursen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSasian, Joseen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDvorak, Katerinaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10624en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753358en_US
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