Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193611
Title:
Split Concrete Model for Shear Behavior of Concrete Beams
Author:
Kamat, Anuja Ganesh
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Split Concrete Model (SCM) is a unified approach towards modeling shear behavior in concrete. SCM is essentially a rational model which is evaluated and modified using a large experimental database.The shear strength of the concrete beam is modeled as the sum of the contribution of concrete, transverse reinforcement, longitudinal reinforcement and bond between concrete and longitudinal reinforcement. Concrete does not contribute to the shear strength after the formation of the crack. In SCM, this is shown to be accurately modeled by only considering the second branch of the critical crack while computing the contribution of concrete towards shear strength of the beam. Formation of the second branch of the critical crack and immediate subsequent failure of the beam has been compared to the split-cylinder test, which forms the conceptual basis of SCM.SCM computes the concrete contribution using the split tensile strength and the area under compression of the concrete beam. For cases where a split-cylinder test is not performed, a mathematical model is proposed to compute the split tensile strength using the compressive strength of concrete available from experimental results. This model is proposed using advanced statistical methods, including weighted residuals and Box-Cox transformation and is validated using various statistical procedures. The transverse reinforcement contributes to the shear strength of the concrete beam only after the formation of the crack. In SCM, this is shown to be accurately modeled by only considering the first branch of the critical crack while computing the contribution of the transverse reinforcement towards shear strength of the beam, instead of the conventional approach of considering the entire length of the crack. The contribution of the longitudinal steel and bond between concrete and longitudinal steel and concrete is accurately modeled unlike the conventional approaches which do not consider this contribution.Evaluation using the database shows that SCM can predict accurate results for all ranges of strength, depth, reinforcement ratio, and shear span to depth ratio of the beam. This shows that all the influencing parameters for concrete shear strength have been correctly modeled in SCM. SCM gives more accurate results as compared to current codified approaches as verified with design examples. Finally, specific recommendations have been made indicating how the shear design requirements in the current ACI code can be modified.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
split concrete model; shear behavior; concrete; reinforced concrete beams; prestressed concrete beams; shear reinforcement
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Civil Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Haldar, Achintya
Committee Chair:
Haldar, Achintya

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleSplit Concrete Model for Shear Behavior of Concrete Beamsen_US
dc.creatorKamat, Anuja Ganeshen_US
dc.contributor.authorKamat, Anuja Ganeshen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSplit Concrete Model (SCM) is a unified approach towards modeling shear behavior in concrete. SCM is essentially a rational model which is evaluated and modified using a large experimental database.The shear strength of the concrete beam is modeled as the sum of the contribution of concrete, transverse reinforcement, longitudinal reinforcement and bond between concrete and longitudinal reinforcement. Concrete does not contribute to the shear strength after the formation of the crack. In SCM, this is shown to be accurately modeled by only considering the second branch of the critical crack while computing the contribution of concrete towards shear strength of the beam. Formation of the second branch of the critical crack and immediate subsequent failure of the beam has been compared to the split-cylinder test, which forms the conceptual basis of SCM.SCM computes the concrete contribution using the split tensile strength and the area under compression of the concrete beam. For cases where a split-cylinder test is not performed, a mathematical model is proposed to compute the split tensile strength using the compressive strength of concrete available from experimental results. This model is proposed using advanced statistical methods, including weighted residuals and Box-Cox transformation and is validated using various statistical procedures. The transverse reinforcement contributes to the shear strength of the concrete beam only after the formation of the crack. In SCM, this is shown to be accurately modeled by only considering the first branch of the critical crack while computing the contribution of the transverse reinforcement towards shear strength of the beam, instead of the conventional approach of considering the entire length of the crack. The contribution of the longitudinal steel and bond between concrete and longitudinal steel and concrete is accurately modeled unlike the conventional approaches which do not consider this contribution.Evaluation using the database shows that SCM can predict accurate results for all ranges of strength, depth, reinforcement ratio, and shear span to depth ratio of the beam. This shows that all the influencing parameters for concrete shear strength have been correctly modeled in SCM. SCM gives more accurate results as compared to current codified approaches as verified with design examples. Finally, specific recommendations have been made indicating how the shear design requirements in the current ACI code can be modified.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectsplit concrete modelen_US
dc.subjectshear behavioren_US
dc.subjectconcreteen_US
dc.subjectreinforced concrete beamsen_US
dc.subjectprestressed concrete beamsen_US
dc.subjectshear reinforcementen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHaldar, Achintyaen_US
dc.contributor.chairHaldar, Achintyaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberContractor, Dinshawen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKundu, Tribikramen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1964en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746542en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.