Removal of Adsorbed Moisture and Organics from Surfaces and Nanostructures in Semiconductor Manufacturing

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193597
Title:
Removal of Adsorbed Moisture and Organics from Surfaces and Nanostructures in Semiconductor Manufacturing
Author:
Juneja, Harpreet
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
As the semiconductor industry is moving towards achieving smaller, denser and faster integrated circuits; the issue of contamination control is becoming increasingly important. The current work focuses on the mechanism and kinetics of removal of adsorbed moisture and organics from surfaces and nanostructures.In the first application of this study, a novel approach to the characterization of dynamic interactions of gases with solid surfaces is developed. A model is developed to represent the simultaneous adsorption and desorption processes in these systems. The model can simulate both the non-equilibrium adsorption and desorption processes as well as the equilibrium state (isotherms and isobars). The model is validated using experimental data, and applied to the adsorption of moisture on oxides (ZrO2 and HfO2). Practical application of this work is shown by optimizing the purge recipes for removal of moisture from a ZrO2 film.In the second application, a novel approach is developed and demonstrated to characterize the sampling line effects during dynamic monitoring of fluid concentrations. The "Sampling line" in this study refers to all components between the point of fluid sampling and the point of analyzer sensor. In general, sampling lines introduce errors in measurements by altering the sample properties due to the fluid transport in the line as well as the adsorption and desorption of fluid constituents on the surfaces of the sampling components that come in contact with the sample fluid. A methodology based on a sampling line simulator is developed for taking these effects into account and correcting the measurements. The sampling line simulator can be used to analyze the effect of various sampling configurations and operating conditions.In the last application, experiments were carried out to study the interaction of organics with micro/nano particles representing nanostructures. A process model is developed which gives insight about the mechanism and kinetics of these interactions. The micro/nano particles, due to their large surface area, can adsorb any other species which may result in the change in their properties. This may ultimately affect the process in which they exist. This study will also be helpful in analyzing the Environment, Safety and Health (ESH) effects of nanostructures.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Chemical Engineering
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Chemical Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Shadman, Farhang
Committee Chair:
Shadman, Farhang

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleRemoval of Adsorbed Moisture and Organics from Surfaces and Nanostructures in Semiconductor Manufacturingen_US
dc.creatorJuneja, Harpreeten_US
dc.contributor.authorJuneja, Harpreeten_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAs the semiconductor industry is moving towards achieving smaller, denser and faster integrated circuits; the issue of contamination control is becoming increasingly important. The current work focuses on the mechanism and kinetics of removal of adsorbed moisture and organics from surfaces and nanostructures.In the first application of this study, a novel approach to the characterization of dynamic interactions of gases with solid surfaces is developed. A model is developed to represent the simultaneous adsorption and desorption processes in these systems. The model can simulate both the non-equilibrium adsorption and desorption processes as well as the equilibrium state (isotherms and isobars). The model is validated using experimental data, and applied to the adsorption of moisture on oxides (ZrO2 and HfO2). Practical application of this work is shown by optimizing the purge recipes for removal of moisture from a ZrO2 film.In the second application, a novel approach is developed and demonstrated to characterize the sampling line effects during dynamic monitoring of fluid concentrations. The "Sampling line" in this study refers to all components between the point of fluid sampling and the point of analyzer sensor. In general, sampling lines introduce errors in measurements by altering the sample properties due to the fluid transport in the line as well as the adsorption and desorption of fluid constituents on the surfaces of the sampling components that come in contact with the sample fluid. A methodology based on a sampling line simulator is developed for taking these effects into account and correcting the measurements. The sampling line simulator can be used to analyze the effect of various sampling configurations and operating conditions.In the last application, experiments were carried out to study the interaction of organics with micro/nano particles representing nanostructures. A process model is developed which gives insight about the mechanism and kinetics of these interactions. The micro/nano particles, due to their large surface area, can adsorb any other species which may result in the change in their properties. This may ultimately affect the process in which they exist. This study will also be helpful in analyzing the Environment, Safety and Health (ESH) effects of nanostructures.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectChemical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorShadman, Farhangen_US
dc.contributor.chairShadman, Farhangen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMuscat, Anthonyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRaghavan, Srinien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBlowers, Paulen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10110en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659750647en_US
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