Development of Reactive Ion Scattering Spectrometry (RISS) as an Analytical Surface Characterization Technique

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193593
Title:
Development of Reactive Ion Scattering Spectrometry (RISS) as an Analytical Surface Characterization Technique
Author:
Joyce, Karen Elaine
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Reactive ion scattering spectrometry (RISS) utilizing low energy (tens of eV) polyatomic ions was employed to characterize self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold. The terminal composition of halogenated SAMs, chemisorption motifs of disulfide and diselenide SAMs, and electron transfer properties of molecular wire containing SAMs were interrogated to develop the versatility of RISS as an analytical surface characterization technique.Novel halogen terminated SAMs were examined for their ability to convert translational to vibrational energy of colliding projectile ions. A general increasing energy deposition trend correlated with increasing terminal mass with the exception of the iodine functionality. Increased amounts of surface abstractions and sputtering from C12I suggest competitive ion-surface interactions account for less than predicted energy deposition results. Mixed films of CH2Br and CH3 terminal groups elucidated interfacial surface crowding discerned by energy deposition results.Thiol and disulfide based SAMs were shown by RISS comparisons to be dissimilar in structure. Terminal orientation, however, was the same based on ion-surface reactions, disproving the proposed dimer model of disulfide SAMs. Ion-surface reactions and electron transfer properties of disulfide surfaces suggested greater percentages of c(4x2) superlattice structure than in thiol SAMs. Based on increased hydrogen reactivity, decreased methyl reactivity, and increased energy deposition results, diselenide based SAMs were more disordered than S-Au based SAMs. Electron transfer results monitored through total ion currents (TIC) showed Se-Au contacts are more conductive than S-Au attachments.Molecular wire candidates whose electron transfer capabilities are difficult to characterize by traditional techniques were characterized by RISS after being doped into matrix SAMs. Electron transfer properties were dependent on the isolating SAM matrix, dipole moments of the wires, and the potential applied to the surface. Changes in surface voltage dictated molecular wire geometry and electron transfer. Wires were annealed into preferential geometries by colliding ions, but did not operate as switches.While not related to the advancement of RISS, structural elucidation of the pharmaceutical carvidioliol was investigated by collision-induced dissociation, surface-induced dissociation, sustained off-resonance irradiation, and sustained off-resonance irradiation-resonant excitation and through gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange. This molecule fragmented easily by all methods and demonstrated the chemical specificity of gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Molecular Wires; Reactive Ion Scattering Spectrometry (RISS); Self-assembled monolayers; Surface Characterization
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Chemistry; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wysocki, Vicki H.
Committee Chair:
Wysocki, Vicki H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleDevelopment of Reactive Ion Scattering Spectrometry (RISS) as an Analytical Surface Characterization Techniqueen_US
dc.creatorJoyce, Karen Elaineen_US
dc.contributor.authorJoyce, Karen Elaineen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractReactive ion scattering spectrometry (RISS) utilizing low energy (tens of eV) polyatomic ions was employed to characterize self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold. The terminal composition of halogenated SAMs, chemisorption motifs of disulfide and diselenide SAMs, and electron transfer properties of molecular wire containing SAMs were interrogated to develop the versatility of RISS as an analytical surface characterization technique.Novel halogen terminated SAMs were examined for their ability to convert translational to vibrational energy of colliding projectile ions. A general increasing energy deposition trend correlated with increasing terminal mass with the exception of the iodine functionality. Increased amounts of surface abstractions and sputtering from C12I suggest competitive ion-surface interactions account for less than predicted energy deposition results. Mixed films of CH2Br and CH3 terminal groups elucidated interfacial surface crowding discerned by energy deposition results.Thiol and disulfide based SAMs were shown by RISS comparisons to be dissimilar in structure. Terminal orientation, however, was the same based on ion-surface reactions, disproving the proposed dimer model of disulfide SAMs. Ion-surface reactions and electron transfer properties of disulfide surfaces suggested greater percentages of c(4x2) superlattice structure than in thiol SAMs. Based on increased hydrogen reactivity, decreased methyl reactivity, and increased energy deposition results, diselenide based SAMs were more disordered than S-Au based SAMs. Electron transfer results monitored through total ion currents (TIC) showed Se-Au contacts are more conductive than S-Au attachments.Molecular wire candidates whose electron transfer capabilities are difficult to characterize by traditional techniques were characterized by RISS after being doped into matrix SAMs. Electron transfer properties were dependent on the isolating SAM matrix, dipole moments of the wires, and the potential applied to the surface. Changes in surface voltage dictated molecular wire geometry and electron transfer. Wires were annealed into preferential geometries by colliding ions, but did not operate as switches.While not related to the advancement of RISS, structural elucidation of the pharmaceutical carvidioliol was investigated by collision-induced dissociation, surface-induced dissociation, sustained off-resonance irradiation, and sustained off-resonance irradiation-resonant excitation and through gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange. This molecule fragmented easily by all methods and demonstrated the chemical specificity of gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectMolecular Wiresen_US
dc.subjectReactive Ion Scattering Spectrometry (RISS)en_US
dc.subjectSelf-assembled monolayersen_US
dc.subjectSurface Characterizationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWysocki, Vicki H.en_US
dc.contributor.chairWysocki, Vicki H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPemberton, Jeanne E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSaavedra, S. Scotten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMash, Eugene A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10000en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749973en_US
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