Spatial Decision Making: Using a Geographic Information System and the Analytic Hierarchy Process for Pre-Wildfire Management

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193578
Title:
Spatial Decision Making: Using a Geographic Information System and the Analytic Hierarchy Process for Pre-Wildfire Management
Author:
Johnson, Peter Schilling
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Strategic management of wildlands for fire is increasingly a mix of traditional firescience, climatology and human perceptions. Not only must managers be expert atmodeling fuels and fire behavior, they must also understand human behavior, and theeffects of climate on landscapes. We hypothiszed that areas in national forests differspatially in their importance to stakeholders, including both the public and landmanagers. That this difference is based upon the inclusion of factors not typically foundin wildland fire models. To test this hypothesis we used a multidimensional approach toassess the spatial variability several factors including recreation, property values and fuelmoisture. This approach combined a geographic information system with the analytichierarchy process to predict and test the current distribution of areas in national forestsimportant to stakeholders.Inclusion of stakeholders appears to improve the validity and useability of aspatial decision support system. Comparing the model created in this dissertation withseveral others demonstrates that it is important to strike the right balance betweenstakeholders and technical experts when designing and creating a model. It is alwaysbeneficial, however, to a significant level of stakeholder involvement.Areas important for fire mitigation efforts depended on the stakeholder oraudience rating the model. Raters from the U.S. Forest Service tended to favor areas withhigh fire probability scores, while those from the Park Service prefered recreation areasand places people value. In both cases, locations people had easy access to, such as alongroads and trails were favored.These results confirmed the hypothesis that areas of importance are differentbased on the individual rating the model. Further testing and refinement of the modelincludes expanding the study area beyond the southwestern United States as wells asobtaining better sources of data with finer spatial resolutions.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Arizona; wildfires; GIS; AHP; spatial decision making
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Geography; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Christopherson, Gary L.; Yool, Stephen R.
Committee Chair:
Christopherson, Gary L.; Yool, Stephen R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleSpatial Decision Making: Using a Geographic Information System and the Analytic Hierarchy Process for Pre-Wildfire Managementen_US
dc.creatorJohnson, Peter Schillingen_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Peter Schillingen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractStrategic management of wildlands for fire is increasingly a mix of traditional firescience, climatology and human perceptions. Not only must managers be expert atmodeling fuels and fire behavior, they must also understand human behavior, and theeffects of climate on landscapes. We hypothiszed that areas in national forests differspatially in their importance to stakeholders, including both the public and landmanagers. That this difference is based upon the inclusion of factors not typically foundin wildland fire models. To test this hypothesis we used a multidimensional approach toassess the spatial variability several factors including recreation, property values and fuelmoisture. This approach combined a geographic information system with the analytichierarchy process to predict and test the current distribution of areas in national forestsimportant to stakeholders.Inclusion of stakeholders appears to improve the validity and useability of aspatial decision support system. Comparing the model created in this dissertation withseveral others demonstrates that it is important to strike the right balance betweenstakeholders and technical experts when designing and creating a model. It is alwaysbeneficial, however, to a significant level of stakeholder involvement.Areas important for fire mitigation efforts depended on the stakeholder oraudience rating the model. Raters from the U.S. Forest Service tended to favor areas withhigh fire probability scores, while those from the Park Service prefered recreation areasand places people value. In both cases, locations people had easy access to, such as alongroads and trails were favored.These results confirmed the hypothesis that areas of importance are differentbased on the individual rating the model. Further testing and refinement of the modelincludes expanding the study area beyond the southwestern United States as wells asobtaining better sources of data with finer spatial resolutions.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectwildfiresen_US
dc.subjectGISen_US
dc.subjectAHPen_US
dc.subjectspatial decision makingen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorChristopherson, Gary L.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorYool, Stephen R.en_US
dc.contributor.chairChristopherson, Gary L.en_US
dc.contributor.chairYool, Stephen R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGuertin, D. Phillipen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMorehouse, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberde Steigeur, Eden_US
dc.identifier.proquest2581en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749589en_US
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