Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193576
Title:
Liquid Crystal Active Optics for Military Imaging Systems
Author:
Bagwell, Brett Edward
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
There are inherent tradeoffs in size, weight, and adaptability for many military imaging systems. In some cases, active optical devices provide new alternatives external to the traditional trade-space. Applications of interest include remote wide-area surveillance, tactical use of high altitude and space-based sensors, remote navigation of unmanned ground and air vehicles, and night vision systems.My goal is to demonstrate that by augmenting or replacing static dioptric, catatropic, or catadioptric optical designs, mechanical complexity can be reduced while either maintaining or increasing performance in three areas:(1). Spectral Resolution(2). Spatial Resolution(3). MagnificationI present here three different imaging systems to showcase these capabilities.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Adaptive Optics; Liquid Crystals; Spatial Light Modulators; Nonmechanical Zoom; Foveated Imaging; Multispectral
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Optical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Schwiegerling, Jim

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleLiquid Crystal Active Optics for Military Imaging Systemsen_US
dc.creatorBagwell, Brett Edwarden_US
dc.contributor.authorBagwell, Brett Edwarden_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThere are inherent tradeoffs in size, weight, and adaptability for many military imaging systems. In some cases, active optical devices provide new alternatives external to the traditional trade-space. Applications of interest include remote wide-area surveillance, tactical use of high altitude and space-based sensors, remote navigation of unmanned ground and air vehicles, and night vision systems.My goal is to demonstrate that by augmenting or replacing static dioptric, catatropic, or catadioptric optical designs, mechanical complexity can be reduced while either maintaining or increasing performance in three areas:(1). Spectral Resolution(2). Spatial Resolution(3). MagnificationI present here three different imaging systems to showcase these capabilities.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAdaptive Opticsen_US
dc.subjectLiquid Crystalsen_US
dc.subjectSpatial Light Modulatorsen_US
dc.subjectNonmechanical Zoomen_US
dc.subjectFoveated Imagingen_US
dc.subjectMultispectralen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairSchwiegerling, Jimen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDallas, William J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGreivenkamp, John E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1696en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747475en_US
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