Naive Psychology: Preschoolers' Understanding of Intention and False Belief and Its Relationship to Mental Word

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193561
Title:
Naive Psychology: Preschoolers' Understanding of Intention and False Belief and Its Relationship to Mental Word
Author:
Jian, Jianhua
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In the current study, children’s understanding of false belief, intention, and their ability to distinguish the appearance of a character from its reality was investigated. Seventy-two three to five years olds were recruited from several preschools in the Silicon Valley in California. During the experiment, children were shown an animated movie in a computer and asked the false belief, intention, and appearance-reality distinction questions. Following the animated movie, children were also asked if they understand 10 mental words that depicted the human mind, such as think, want, believe, etc. The relationship between the children’s knowledge of the human mind and the mental words they understood was explored. Results of the current study revealed that children who were four and half to five performed better than children three and half to four on false belief tasks. Children’s performance on intention and appearance-reality distinction questions did not differ significantly across age. However, girls’ performance was superior to boys’ performance on intention questions. Similarly, girls’ knowledge of overall naïve psychology was also superior to that of boys. Moreover, the order of the naïve psychology concepts that children passed in current study was from intention to appearance-reality distinction and then false belief. Finally, the regression analysis of the data revealed that the mental word vocabulary children processed was closely related to naïve psychology development. More specifically, the number of total mental words that were reported by children or assessed by contextual questions was a significant predictor of naïve psychology knowledge.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Naive Psychology; Theory of Mind; Naive Theory; Intention; False Belief
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rosser, Rosemary
Committee Chair:
Rosser, Rosemary

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleNaive Psychology: Preschoolers' Understanding of Intention and False Belief and Its Relationship to Mental Worden_US
dc.creatorJian, Jianhuaen_US
dc.contributor.authorJian, Jianhuaen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn the current study, children’s understanding of false belief, intention, and their ability to distinguish the appearance of a character from its reality was investigated. Seventy-two three to five years olds were recruited from several preschools in the Silicon Valley in California. During the experiment, children were shown an animated movie in a computer and asked the false belief, intention, and appearance-reality distinction questions. Following the animated movie, children were also asked if they understand 10 mental words that depicted the human mind, such as think, want, believe, etc. The relationship between the children’s knowledge of the human mind and the mental words they understood was explored. Results of the current study revealed that children who were four and half to five performed better than children three and half to four on false belief tasks. Children’s performance on intention and appearance-reality distinction questions did not differ significantly across age. However, girls’ performance was superior to boys’ performance on intention questions. Similarly, girls’ knowledge of overall naïve psychology was also superior to that of boys. Moreover, the order of the naïve psychology concepts that children passed in current study was from intention to appearance-reality distinction and then false belief. Finally, the regression analysis of the data revealed that the mental word vocabulary children processed was closely related to naïve psychology development. More specifically, the number of total mental words that were reported by children or assessed by contextual questions was a significant predictor of naïve psychology knowledge.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectNaive Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectTheory of Minden_US
dc.subjectNaive Theoryen_US
dc.subjectIntentionen_US
dc.subjectFalse Beliefen_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRosser, Rosemaryen_US
dc.contributor.chairRosser, Rosemaryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAleamoni, Lawrence M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBauman, Sherien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWilkes, Glendaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1526en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137356365en_US
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