Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193523
Title:
Aquaporin-1 Mediated Fluid Movement in Ocular Tissues
Author:
Baetz, Nicholas William
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Aquaporin proteins significantly increase water permeability across tissues and cell membranes. Ocular tissues, including the trabecular meshwork (TM) and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), are especially reliant on aquaporin mediated water movement for ocular homeostasis. Even though bulk fluid movement is paracellular through the TM and transcellular through the RPE, both express aquaporin-1 (AQP1). The role and regulation of AQP1 as it relates to homeostasis in different ocular tissues is not well understood. I hypothesized that ocular tissues respond to external mechanical and molecular cues by altering AQP1 expression and function in order to regulate ocular fluid movement and maintain homeostasis.To test how AQP1 function is altered in response to external cues in order to maintain tissue-specific homeostasis, I addressed the following two aims. The first aim was directed at determining how mechanical strain, an external stimulus that routinely affects TM function, influences AQP1 expression and TM homeostasis. Primary cultures of human TM were subjected to static and cyclic stretch and then analyzed for changes in AQP1 expression by western blot and cell damage by activity of lactate dehydrogense (LDH) in conditioned media. The results show AQP1 expression and LDH release significantly increased with static stretch. Analysis of LDH release with respect to AQP1 expression revealed an inverse linear relationship (r² = 0.7780).The second aim was directed at characterizing signaling mechanisms responsible for regulating fluid transport in RPE, previously shown to be dependent upon AQP1. I treated primary cultures of human RPE with either atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) or 8-bromo-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (8-Br-cGMP) in the presence or absence of Anantin (ANP-receptor inhibitor) or H-8 (Protein Kinase G inhibitor). The results show that ANP and 8-Br-cGMP significantly increased apical to basal net fluid movement (p < 0.05, n = 3). Inhibition of these effects was successful with Anantin treatment but not with application of H-8.The data presented demonstrate a novel role of protection for AQP1 in TM, and also expand upon cGMP dependent regulation of RPE fluid transport. The combined studies indicate tissue specific AQP1 regulation may offer new avenues to target water movement in treatment of ocular pathologies.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Aquaporin-1; Mechanical Strain; Natriuretic Peptide; Ocular Fluid Movement; Retinal Pigment Epithelium; Trabecular Meshwork
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Cell Biology & Anatomy; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Stamer, W. Daniel; Yool, Andrea J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleAquaporin-1 Mediated Fluid Movement in Ocular Tissuesen_US
dc.creatorBaetz, Nicholas Williamen_US
dc.contributor.authorBaetz, Nicholas Williamen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAquaporin proteins significantly increase water permeability across tissues and cell membranes. Ocular tissues, including the trabecular meshwork (TM) and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), are especially reliant on aquaporin mediated water movement for ocular homeostasis. Even though bulk fluid movement is paracellular through the TM and transcellular through the RPE, both express aquaporin-1 (AQP1). The role and regulation of AQP1 as it relates to homeostasis in different ocular tissues is not well understood. I hypothesized that ocular tissues respond to external mechanical and molecular cues by altering AQP1 expression and function in order to regulate ocular fluid movement and maintain homeostasis.To test how AQP1 function is altered in response to external cues in order to maintain tissue-specific homeostasis, I addressed the following two aims. The first aim was directed at determining how mechanical strain, an external stimulus that routinely affects TM function, influences AQP1 expression and TM homeostasis. Primary cultures of human TM were subjected to static and cyclic stretch and then analyzed for changes in AQP1 expression by western blot and cell damage by activity of lactate dehydrogense (LDH) in conditioned media. The results show AQP1 expression and LDH release significantly increased with static stretch. Analysis of LDH release with respect to AQP1 expression revealed an inverse linear relationship (r² = 0.7780).The second aim was directed at characterizing signaling mechanisms responsible for regulating fluid transport in RPE, previously shown to be dependent upon AQP1. I treated primary cultures of human RPE with either atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) or 8-bromo-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (8-Br-cGMP) in the presence or absence of Anantin (ANP-receptor inhibitor) or H-8 (Protein Kinase G inhibitor). The results show that ANP and 8-Br-cGMP significantly increased apical to basal net fluid movement (p < 0.05, n = 3). Inhibition of these effects was successful with Anantin treatment but not with application of H-8.The data presented demonstrate a novel role of protection for AQP1 in TM, and also expand upon cGMP dependent regulation of RPE fluid transport. The combined studies indicate tissue specific AQP1 regulation may offer new avenues to target water movement in treatment of ocular pathologies.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAquaporin-1en_US
dc.subjectMechanical Strainen_US
dc.subjectNatriuretic Peptideen_US
dc.subjectOcular Fluid Movementen_US
dc.subjectRetinal Pigment Epitheliumen_US
dc.subjectTrabecular Meshworken_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCell Biology & Anatomyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairStamer, W. Danielen_US
dc.contributor.chairYool, Andrea J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWilson, Jean M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBoitano, Scott A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWright, Stephen H.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10234en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752259921en_US
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