On Living and Dying in Rhetoric: An Analysis of the Writings of Jim W. Corder

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193515
Title:
On Living and Dying in Rhetoric: An Analysis of the Writings of Jim W. Corder
Author:
Jacovitch, Jennifer
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
An analysis and discussion of selected writings of Jim W. Corder, this project traces the development of Corder's theory of rhetoric across four decades, spanning from the late 1950s to the late 1990s. As one of the most prolific scholars in the history of the modern discipline of rhetoric and composition, Corder's body of writings is a continuous work in progress, one that begins with Corder's initial interest in rhetoric study within the context of literary criticism and grows into his in-depth consideration of the history and canons of rhetoric, with specific emphasis on theories of ethos and invention, the teaching of composition, the liberal arts tradition, and his later engagement with postmodern theories authorship, memory, and identity. The dissertation seeks to reclaim and reassert Corder's rhetorical perspective as means to shape future research in rhetorical analysis and composition pedagogy.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Argument; Composition; Ethos; History; Pedagogy; Rhetoric
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Enos, Theresa J.
Committee Chair:
Enos, Theresa J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleOn Living and Dying in Rhetoric: An Analysis of the Writings of Jim W. Corderen_US
dc.creatorJacovitch, Jenniferen_US
dc.contributor.authorJacovitch, Jenniferen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAn analysis and discussion of selected writings of Jim W. Corder, this project traces the development of Corder's theory of rhetoric across four decades, spanning from the late 1950s to the late 1990s. As one of the most prolific scholars in the history of the modern discipline of rhetoric and composition, Corder's body of writings is a continuous work in progress, one that begins with Corder's initial interest in rhetoric study within the context of literary criticism and grows into his in-depth consideration of the history and canons of rhetoric, with specific emphasis on theories of ethos and invention, the teaching of composition, the liberal arts tradition, and his later engagement with postmodern theories authorship, memory, and identity. The dissertation seeks to reclaim and reassert Corder's rhetorical perspective as means to shape future research in rhetorical analysis and composition pedagogy.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectArgumenten_US
dc.subjectCompositionen_US
dc.subjectEthosen_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
dc.subjectPedagogyen_US
dc.subjectRhetoricen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorEnos, Theresa J.en_US
dc.contributor.chairEnos, Theresa J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMiller, Keith D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHall, Anne-Marieen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLicona, Adela C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest11178en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752261032en_US
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