Military Spending and the Washington Consensus: The Unrecognized Link between Militarization and the Global Political Economy

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193513
Title:
Military Spending and the Washington Consensus: The Unrecognized Link between Militarization and the Global Political Economy
Author:
Jackson, Susan Teresa
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Military spending briefly dipped in the early 1990s only to rebound by the end of the 20th century, yet policymakers and academics alike predicted a peace dividend if the cold war should end. What happened to this peace dividend? How do some countries actualize a peace dividend in a world that seems not to encourage one? Typically military spending is analyzed through lenses focusing on international politics, bureaucratic process, or domestic political economy. I argue that these three lenses have failed to account for some of the reasons military spending remains high in the post-cold war era. Utilizing sociological institutionalism and world models, I examine how the rules of the Washington consensus via the neo-liberal economic agenda and the national security exception promote high levels of military spending that the three main theories fail to recognize. This study particularly delves into the roles of states and transnational corporations in terms of competitiveness in the global political economy and privileges allotted to the military industry. My tests rely on fuzzy-set comparative qualitative analysis (fsQCA) as an innovative means for looking at necessary conditions as well as sufficient conjunctural causation through which countries can achieve a peace dividend in the post-cold war era.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
militarization; globalization; military spending; Washington consensus; national security exception; sociological institutionalism
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Political Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Volgy, Thomas J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleMilitary Spending and the Washington Consensus: The Unrecognized Link between Militarization and the Global Political Economyen_US
dc.creatorJackson, Susan Teresaen_US
dc.contributor.authorJackson, Susan Teresaen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMilitary spending briefly dipped in the early 1990s only to rebound by the end of the 20th century, yet policymakers and academics alike predicted a peace dividend if the cold war should end. What happened to this peace dividend? How do some countries actualize a peace dividend in a world that seems not to encourage one? Typically military spending is analyzed through lenses focusing on international politics, bureaucratic process, or domestic political economy. I argue that these three lenses have failed to account for some of the reasons military spending remains high in the post-cold war era. Utilizing sociological institutionalism and world models, I examine how the rules of the Washington consensus via the neo-liberal economic agenda and the national security exception promote high levels of military spending that the three main theories fail to recognize. This study particularly delves into the roles of states and transnational corporations in terms of competitiveness in the global political economy and privileges allotted to the military industry. My tests rely on fuzzy-set comparative qualitative analysis (fsQCA) as an innovative means for looking at necessary conditions as well as sufficient conjunctural causation through which countries can achieve a peace dividend in the post-cold war era.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectmilitarizationen_US
dc.subjectglobalizationen_US
dc.subjectmilitary spendingen_US
dc.subjectWashington consensusen_US
dc.subjectnational security exceptionen_US
dc.subjectsociological institutionalismen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairVolgy, Thomas J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPeterson, V. Spikeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRagin, Charlesen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2867en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749929en_US
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