The New Republic's "Other" Daughters: Legislating National Sex and Regulating Prostitution in Istanbul, 1880-1933

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193465
Title:
The New Republic's "Other" Daughters: Legislating National Sex and Regulating Prostitution in Istanbul, 1880-1933
Author:
Wyers, Mark David
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Thesis Not Available (per Author's Request)
Abstract:
Female prostitution in early modern Istanbul was transformed from a local moral concern into an issue of hygiene in the late Ottoman era, and under early Republican leadership prostitution became a matter concerning national progress. In the early twentieth century, prostitution was entwined with narratives on hygiene, abolitionism and women's rights to labor. Elites of the new Republic translated narratives on regulationism into particularly Republican idioms of race, sexuality and civilization. State policies on modernization employed prostitute's bodies as biological and symbolic capital in reproductions of the state as a modern polity. The urban spaces of Istanbul, as the major arena of regulated prostitution, represented contested sites where the state attempted to render ethics of gender and Turkish space at local and international levels. Rationalizing processes of authoritarian state power thus reproduced prostitution as a legal category through which conceptualizations of virtue, progress and modernity were legislated.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
MA
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Near Eastern Studies; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hudson, Leila
Committee Chair:
Hudson, Leila

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe New Republic's "Other" Daughters: Legislating National Sex and Regulating Prostitution in Istanbul, 1880-1933en_US
dc.creatorWyers, Mark Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorWyers, Mark Daviden_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseThesis Not Available (per Author's Request)en_US
dc.description.abstractFemale prostitution in early modern Istanbul was transformed from a local moral concern into an issue of hygiene in the late Ottoman era, and under early Republican leadership prostitution became a matter concerning national progress. In the early twentieth century, prostitution was entwined with narratives on hygiene, abolitionism and women's rights to labor. Elites of the new Republic translated narratives on regulationism into particularly Republican idioms of race, sexuality and civilization. State policies on modernization employed prostitute's bodies as biological and symbolic capital in reproductions of the state as a modern polity. The urban spaces of Istanbul, as the major arena of regulated prostitution, represented contested sites where the state attempted to render ethics of gender and Turkish space at local and international levels. Rationalizing processes of authoritarian state power thus reproduced prostitution as a legal category through which conceptualizations of virtue, progress and modernity were legislated.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameMAen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNear Eastern Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHudson, Leilaen_US
dc.contributor.chairHudson, Leilaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2883en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659750546en_US
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