Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193461
Title:
The Politics of an Epidemic: SARS & Chinatown
Author:
Eichelberger, Laura Palen
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis explores how the 2003 epidemic of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS, threw into relief the myriad historical, political and economic factors that shape understandings of and responses to a new disease. The author traces how the historic "othering" of Chinese immigrants and their descendents in the United States was combined with dominant discourses of risk and blame to understand SARS and the potential for a domestic epidemic. Narratives from community members of Manhattan's Chinatown are used to investigate the local impacts of the production of these discourses during the SARS epidemic. Finally, the author explores how these dominant discourses were applied locally within Chinatown understand local and personal risk.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
SARS; epidemics; racism; Chinatown; risk perceptions; production of fear
Degree Name:
MA
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Green, Linda B
Committee Chair:
Green, Linda B

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Politics of an Epidemic: SARS & Chinatownen_US
dc.creatorEichelberger, Laura Palenen_US
dc.contributor.authorEichelberger, Laura Palenen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores how the 2003 epidemic of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS, threw into relief the myriad historical, political and economic factors that shape understandings of and responses to a new disease. The author traces how the historic "othering" of Chinese immigrants and their descendents in the United States was combined with dominant discourses of risk and blame to understand SARS and the potential for a domestic epidemic. Narratives from community members of Manhattan's Chinatown are used to investigate the local impacts of the production of these discourses during the SARS epidemic. Finally, the author explores how these dominant discourses were applied locally within Chinatown understand local and personal risk.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectSARSen_US
dc.subjectepidemicsen_US
dc.subjectracismen_US
dc.subjectChinatownen_US
dc.subjectrisk perceptionsen_US
dc.subjectproduction of fearen_US
thesis.degree.nameMAen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGreen, Linda Ben_US
dc.contributor.chairGreen, Linda Ben_US
dc.identifier.proquest1301en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137355765en_US
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