Return of Historical Fire: Impacts of Burn Severity and Heterogeneity on Mexican Fox Squirrels

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193451
Title:
Return of Historical Fire: Impacts of Burn Severity and Heterogeneity on Mexican Fox Squirrels
Author:
Doumas, Sandra L.
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
After decades of suppression, fire is returning to forests of western United States. Understanding responses of wildlife species to fire is essential to native species conservation because contemporary fires may not have the same effects on forest structure and landscape patterns as historical fires. I used radio-telemetry to investigate effects of fire severity and heterogeneity on habitat selection of Mexican fox squirrels, Sciurus nayaritensis chiricahuae. Vegetation within home ranges was characterized by more open understory and larger trees than random locations. Squirrels used areas burned at low severity more than unburned areas and those burned at higher severities. Squirrels used areas of moderate burn heterogeneity more than areas of low or high heterogeneity. Return of low-severity fire can help restore habitat for Mexican fox squirrels and other native species in forests with a historical regime of low-severity fire and contribute to understanding of the role of fire in forest ecosystems.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Arizona; Chiricahua fox squirrel; heterogeneity; Sciurus nayaritensis chiricahuae; severity; wildland fire
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Koprowski, John L.
Committee Chair:
Koprowski, John L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleReturn of Historical Fire: Impacts of Burn Severity and Heterogeneity on Mexican Fox Squirrelsen_US
dc.creatorDoumas, Sandra L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDoumas, Sandra L.en_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAfter decades of suppression, fire is returning to forests of western United States. Understanding responses of wildlife species to fire is essential to native species conservation because contemporary fires may not have the same effects on forest structure and landscape patterns as historical fires. I used radio-telemetry to investigate effects of fire severity and heterogeneity on habitat selection of Mexican fox squirrels, Sciurus nayaritensis chiricahuae. Vegetation within home ranges was characterized by more open understory and larger trees than random locations. Squirrels used areas burned at low severity more than unburned areas and those burned at higher severities. Squirrels used areas of moderate burn heterogeneity more than areas of low or high heterogeneity. Return of low-severity fire can help restore habitat for Mexican fox squirrels and other native species in forests with a historical regime of low-severity fire and contribute to understanding of the role of fire in forest ecosystems.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectChiricahua fox squirrelen_US
dc.subjectheterogeneityen_US
dc.subjectSciurus nayaritensis chiricahuaeen_US
dc.subjectseverityen_US
dc.subjectwildland fireen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNatural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKoprowski, John L.en_US
dc.contributor.chairKoprowski, John L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMannan, R. Williamen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSteidl, Robert J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest11404en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752261271en_US
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