Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193432
Title:
THEORETICAL STUDY OF DECOMPOSITION OF DIAZENIUMDIOLATES
Author:
Blanco-Ocampo, Alejandro
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Nitric oxide (NO) has become a molecule of interest in biological research. NO is generated via the oxidation of L-arginine, by NO synthase (NOS), and plays a key role in many bioregulatory systems, including smooth muscle relaxation, platelet inhibition, neurotransmission, and immune stimulation, primarily through the formation of cGMP. N-Diazeniumdiolates (NONOates) are an interesting class of compound that can deliver NO specifically to a target site, with potential biological or therapeutic value and minimal side effects. The versatility of NONOates makes them ideal for studying NO in many different scenarios. Primary amine diazeniumdiolates such as isopropyl amine (IPA/NO) can release HNO under physiological conditions.\\Quantitative Structure Activity/Property Relationships (QSAR/QSPR) relate the structure of a compound, to a property/activity of interest ( biological activity). QSAR/QSPR studies are of great importance in drug design. Model that predict the half-lives of NONOates was built and were studied the influence of each variable on decomposition rate. External validation of this model will be made using new set of NONOates to test the Model.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Diazeniumdiolates; Half-life; Nitric Oxide; NONOates; QSAR
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Chemistry; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
MIRANDA, KATRINA M.
Committee Chair:
MIRANDA, KATRINA M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHEORETICAL STUDY OF DECOMPOSITION OF DIAZENIUMDIOLATESen_US
dc.creatorBlanco-Ocampo, Alejandroen_US
dc.contributor.authorBlanco-Ocampo, Alejandroen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractNitric oxide (NO) has become a molecule of interest in biological research. NO is generated via the oxidation of L-arginine, by NO synthase (NOS), and plays a key role in many bioregulatory systems, including smooth muscle relaxation, platelet inhibition, neurotransmission, and immune stimulation, primarily through the formation of cGMP. N-Diazeniumdiolates (NONOates) are an interesting class of compound that can deliver NO specifically to a target site, with potential biological or therapeutic value and minimal side effects. The versatility of NONOates makes them ideal for studying NO in many different scenarios. Primary amine diazeniumdiolates such as isopropyl amine (IPA/NO) can release HNO under physiological conditions.\\Quantitative Structure Activity/Property Relationships (QSAR/QSPR) relate the structure of a compound, to a property/activity of interest ( biological activity). QSAR/QSPR studies are of great importance in drug design. Model that predict the half-lives of NONOates was built and were studied the influence of each variable on decomposition rate. External validation of this model will be made using new set of NONOates to test the Model.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectDiazeniumdiolatesen_US
dc.subjectHalf-lifeen_US
dc.subjectNitric Oxideen_US
dc.subjectNONOatesen_US
dc.subjectQSARen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMIRANDA, KATRINA M.en_US
dc.contributor.chairMIRANDA, KATRINA M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMONTI, OLIVER L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMONTFORT, WILLIAM R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest11387en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752261253en_US
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