The Effects of the Images of Women of Color in Mainstream Hip Hop and Reggaeton on Body Satisfaction and Body Mass Index in Mexican Descent College-Age Women

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193420
Title:
The Effects of the Images of Women of Color in Mainstream Hip Hop and Reggaeton on Body Satisfaction and Body Mass Index in Mexican Descent College-Age Women
Author:
Hackman, Anna
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
There are potentially negative health impacts of women's internalization of representations of women of color in mainstream on body esteem and weight. This study explores the relationships between mainstream hip hop, body satisfaction and body mass index (BMI) in Mexican descent college-age women. The study predicts that women who regularly listen to mainstream hip hop will be more likely to internalize the images of women. Internalization will predict body satisfaction and body satisfaction will predict BMI. Sixty-five participants completed a self-report survey with these measures. Regularly listening to mainstream hip hop was associated with higher hip hop internalization. Higher internalization was associated with less body satisfaction which, in turn, was associated with a higher BMI. Thus, women who regularly listen to mainstream hip hop and who internalize the images of women seem more critical of their body, which negatively affects their weight.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Body Mass Index; Body Satisfaction; Hip Hop; Mainstream media; Popular Culture; Women of Color
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Mexican American Studies; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Romero, Andrea J

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Effects of the Images of Women of Color in Mainstream Hip Hop and Reggaeton on Body Satisfaction and Body Mass Index in Mexican Descent College-Age Womenen_US
dc.creatorHackman, Annaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHackman, Annaen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThere are potentially negative health impacts of women's internalization of representations of women of color in mainstream on body esteem and weight. This study explores the relationships between mainstream hip hop, body satisfaction and body mass index (BMI) in Mexican descent college-age women. The study predicts that women who regularly listen to mainstream hip hop will be more likely to internalize the images of women. Internalization will predict body satisfaction and body satisfaction will predict BMI. Sixty-five participants completed a self-report survey with these measures. Regularly listening to mainstream hip hop was associated with higher hip hop internalization. Higher internalization was associated with less body satisfaction which, in turn, was associated with a higher BMI. Thus, women who regularly listen to mainstream hip hop and who internalize the images of women seem more critical of their body, which negatively affects their weight.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectBody Mass Indexen_US
dc.subjectBody Satisfactionen_US
dc.subjectHip Hopen_US
dc.subjectMainstream mediaen_US
dc.subjectPopular Cultureen_US
dc.subjectWomen of Coloren_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMexican American Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRomero, Andrea Jen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEstrada, Antonio Len_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCarvajal, Scott Cen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10471en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659752176en_US
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