The Influence of Lexical and Sublexical Factors on Acquired Alexia and Agraphia: An Item-Analysis

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193413
Title:
The Influence of Lexical and Sublexical Factors on Acquired Alexia and Agraphia: An Item-Analysis
Author:
Volk, Rebecca Brender
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study used an item-based approach to explore the full range of lexical-semantic (word frequency and imageability) and sublexical characteristics (regularity and consistency) of stimulus items. Oral reading and spelling-to-dictation data from 72 adults with acquired alexia/agraphia due to stroke or progressive aphasia were analyzed to determine unique influences of lexical-semantic and sublexical variables on performance. Multiple regression analyses were performed for each etiology and lesion group (i.e., perisylvian stoke, extrasylvian stroke, perisylvian atrophy, and extrasylvian atrophy). As expected, word frequency had a significant influence on reading and spelling performance in almost all contexts. Of particular interest was the consistent finding that written language performance associated with left perisylvian damage was moderated primarily by lexical-semantic features of stimuli (frequency and imageability), whereas performance by those with left extrasylvian damage was strongly influenced by sublexical features of sound-spelling regularity and, to a lesser extent, consistency.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
acquired alexia and agraphia; item analysis; lexical-semantic variables; progressive aphasia; stroke; sublexical variables
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Beeson, Pelagie M.
Committee Chair:
Beeson, Pelagie M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Influence of Lexical and Sublexical Factors on Acquired Alexia and Agraphia: An Item-Analysisen_US
dc.creatorVolk, Rebecca Brenderen_US
dc.contributor.authorVolk, Rebecca Brenderen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study used an item-based approach to explore the full range of lexical-semantic (word frequency and imageability) and sublexical characteristics (regularity and consistency) of stimulus items. Oral reading and spelling-to-dictation data from 72 adults with acquired alexia/agraphia due to stroke or progressive aphasia were analyzed to determine unique influences of lexical-semantic and sublexical variables on performance. Multiple regression analyses were performed for each etiology and lesion group (i.e., perisylvian stoke, extrasylvian stroke, perisylvian atrophy, and extrasylvian atrophy). As expected, word frequency had a significant influence on reading and spelling performance in almost all contexts. Of particular interest was the consistent finding that written language performance associated with left perisylvian damage was moderated primarily by lexical-semantic features of stimuli (frequency and imageability), whereas performance by those with left extrasylvian damage was strongly influenced by sublexical features of sound-spelling regularity and, to a lesser extent, consistency.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectacquired alexia and agraphiaen_US
dc.subjectitem analysisen_US
dc.subjectlexical-semantic variablesen_US
dc.subjectprogressive aphasiaen_US
dc.subjectstrokeen_US
dc.subjectsublexical variablesen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech, Language, & Hearing Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBeeson, Pelagie M.en_US
dc.contributor.chairBeeson, Pelagie M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRapcsak, Steven Z.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHogan, Tiffany P.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10456en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753405en_US
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