THE ROLE OF DIFFERENT ADIPOCYTE SIZE POPULATIONS IN THE MEDIATION OF OBESITY-RELATED INSULIN RESISTANCE AND INFLAMMATION

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193412
Title:
THE ROLE OF DIFFERENT ADIPOCYTE SIZE POPULATIONS IN THE MEDIATION OF OBESITY-RELATED INSULIN RESISTANCE AND INFLAMMATION
Author:
Thompson, Airlia Camille Simone
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Insulin resistance, the cause of type 2 diabetes mellitus, is intimately linked to the dysregulation of adipose tissue. Recent decades have witnessed the discovery and characterization of numerous hormones produced by adipocytes, including leptin, adiponectin and resistin, underscoring the endocrine functions of adipose tissue. To better understand the role of the adipocyte in the mediation of obesity-related insulin resistance and inflammation, this study has optimized the primary adipocyte isolation technique to minimize inflammation inherent to the isolation procedure and has analyzed adiponectin levels and insulin sensitivities of various adipocyte size populations both in vitro and ex vivo.The data described herein suggest that cell size plays an important, but not solitary, role in the regulation of insulin action and adiponectin production. It is possible that obesity-related insulin resistance is associated with the failure of a population of small adipocytes to expand and produce the insulin sensitizing protein hormone, adiponectin.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Adipocyte; Adiponectin; Diabetes; Inflammation; Obesity
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Molecular & Cellular Biology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Tsao, Tsu-Shuen
Committee Chair:
Tsao, Tsu-Shuen

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleTHE ROLE OF DIFFERENT ADIPOCYTE SIZE POPULATIONS IN THE MEDIATION OF OBESITY-RELATED INSULIN RESISTANCE AND INFLAMMATIONen_US
dc.creatorThompson, Airlia Camille Simoneen_US
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Airlia Camille Simoneen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractInsulin resistance, the cause of type 2 diabetes mellitus, is intimately linked to the dysregulation of adipose tissue. Recent decades have witnessed the discovery and characterization of numerous hormones produced by adipocytes, including leptin, adiponectin and resistin, underscoring the endocrine functions of adipose tissue. To better understand the role of the adipocyte in the mediation of obesity-related insulin resistance and inflammation, this study has optimized the primary adipocyte isolation technique to minimize inflammation inherent to the isolation procedure and has analyzed adiponectin levels and insulin sensitivities of various adipocyte size populations both in vitro and ex vivo.The data described herein suggest that cell size plays an important, but not solitary, role in the regulation of insulin action and adiponectin production. It is possible that obesity-related insulin resistance is associated with the failure of a population of small adipocytes to expand and produce the insulin sensitizing protein hormone, adiponectin.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectAdipocyteen_US
dc.subjectAdiponectinen_US
dc.subjectDiabetesen_US
dc.subjectInflammationen_US
dc.subjectObesityen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMolecular & Cellular Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorTsao, Tsu-Shuenen_US
dc.contributor.chairTsao, Tsu-Shuenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchroeder, Joyce A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberParker, Royen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMiesfeld, Rogeren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWeinert, Teden_US
dc.identifier.proquest10184en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659750761en_US
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