The Influence of Police Brutality on the American Indian Movement's Establishment in Minneapolis, 1968-69

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193405
Title:
The Influence of Police Brutality on the American Indian Movement's Establishment in Minneapolis, 1968-69
Author:
Birong, Christine
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The American Indian Movement (AIM) was established in Minneapolis, Minnesota in July of 1968. During this time, AIM organized around a variety of urban Indian community grievances, particularly police brutality and accountability issues. This thesis provides discussion of the nature of police brutality and police brutality's context in 1960s communities of color. There is also examination and analysis of how AIM organized around the issue of police brutality, direct action tactics, how police brutality impacted specific group members (specifically Clyde Bellecourt), and newspaper coverage of AIM and the police. The purpose of this thesis is to review how and why AIM organized around police brutality.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
AIM; American Indian Movement; Clyde Bellecourt; Kerner Commission; Minneapolis; Police brutality
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
American Indian Studies; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Luna-Firebaugh, Eileen

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Influence of Police Brutality on the American Indian Movement's Establishment in Minneapolis, 1968-69en_US
dc.creatorBirong, Christineen_US
dc.contributor.authorBirong, Christineen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe American Indian Movement (AIM) was established in Minneapolis, Minnesota in July of 1968. During this time, AIM organized around a variety of urban Indian community grievances, particularly police brutality and accountability issues. This thesis provides discussion of the nature of police brutality and police brutality's context in 1960s communities of color. There is also examination and analysis of how AIM organized around the issue of police brutality, direct action tactics, how police brutality impacted specific group members (specifically Clyde Bellecourt), and newspaper coverage of AIM and the police. The purpose of this thesis is to review how and why AIM organized around police brutality.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectAIMen_US
dc.subjectAmerican Indian Movementen_US
dc.subjectClyde Bellecourten_US
dc.subjectKerner Commissionen_US
dc.subjectMinneapolisen_US
dc.subjectPolice brutalityen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairLuna-Firebaugh, Eileenen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10464en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659752171en_US
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