Their Way of Life: A Case Study of Leadership at Denali River Cabins & Kantishna Roadhouse

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193401
Title:
Their Way of Life: A Case Study of Leadership at Denali River Cabins & Kantishna Roadhouse
Author:
Williams, Caroline
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Contemporary Indigenous women's literature illustrates how American Indian women facilitate adaptation from "traditional" communities to diverse urban communities. The objective of this study is to examine how Northern Athabascan women lead in communities which are not exclusive to these Indigenous peoples. The use of Athabascan values such as self-sufficiency, hard work, practice of traditions, caring, sharing, family relations, and respect for elders and others, can be seen as one example of how women lead in non-"traditional" communities. This thesis examines Athabascan women leaders who have worked at two seasonal Native-owned hotels in Alaska as a case study to examine how women lead. By analyzing the women of Doyon Tourism Inc. through the framework of Athabascan values, evidence of cultural continuity can be seen through the sustained use of "traditional" values.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Alaska; American Indian; Athabascan; Indigenous women; Leadership; Native American
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
American Indian Studies; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Tippeconnic Fox, Mary Jo
Committee Chair:
Tippeconnic Fox, Mary Jo

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleTheir Way of Life: A Case Study of Leadership at Denali River Cabins & Kantishna Roadhouseen_US
dc.creatorWilliams, Carolineen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Carolineen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractContemporary Indigenous women's literature illustrates how American Indian women facilitate adaptation from "traditional" communities to diverse urban communities. The objective of this study is to examine how Northern Athabascan women lead in communities which are not exclusive to these Indigenous peoples. The use of Athabascan values such as self-sufficiency, hard work, practice of traditions, caring, sharing, family relations, and respect for elders and others, can be seen as one example of how women lead in non-"traditional" communities. This thesis examines Athabascan women leaders who have worked at two seasonal Native-owned hotels in Alaska as a case study to examine how women lead. By analyzing the women of Doyon Tourism Inc. through the framework of Athabascan values, evidence of cultural continuity can be seen through the sustained use of "traditional" values.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectAlaskaen_US
dc.subjectAmerican Indianen_US
dc.subjectAthabascanen_US
dc.subjectIndigenous womenen_US
dc.subjectLeadershipen_US
dc.subjectNative Americanen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorTippeconnic Fox, Mary Joen_US
dc.contributor.chairTippeconnic Fox, Mary Joen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLomawaima, K. Tsianinaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKennedy, Elizabeth Len_US
dc.identifier.proquest10451en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659752168en_US
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