Self-Imagining, Recognition Memory, and Prospective Memory in Memory-Impaired Individuals with Neurological Damage

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193396
Title:
Self-Imagining, Recognition Memory, and Prospective Memory in Memory-Impaired Individuals with Neurological Damage
Author:
Grilli, Matthew Dennis
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The present study investigated the reliability and robustness of a new mnemonic strategy - self-imagination - in a group of memory-impaired individuals with neurological damage. Despite severe memory deficits, almost all of the participants demonstrated a self-imagination effect (SIE) for recognition memory in study 1. Moreover, the ability to benefit from self-imagination was not affected by the severity of the memory deficit. In study 3, more than half of the participants showed a SIE on a task of event-based prospective memory. The data from study 2 suggest the SIE is not attributable to semantic processing or emotional processing and indicate that self-imagination is distinct from other mnemonic strategies. Overall the findings from the present study implicate self-imagination as a new and effective mnemonic strategy. The data also indicate that when it comes to memory there is something special about processing information in relation to the self.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
cognitive rehabilitation; imagination; prospective memory; recognition memory; self-referential processing
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Glisky, Elizabeth L

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleSelf-Imagining, Recognition Memory, and Prospective Memory in Memory-Impaired Individuals with Neurological Damageen_US
dc.creatorGrilli, Matthew Dennisen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrilli, Matthew Dennisen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe present study investigated the reliability and robustness of a new mnemonic strategy - self-imagination - in a group of memory-impaired individuals with neurological damage. Despite severe memory deficits, almost all of the participants demonstrated a self-imagination effect (SIE) for recognition memory in study 1. Moreover, the ability to benefit from self-imagination was not affected by the severity of the memory deficit. In study 3, more than half of the participants showed a SIE on a task of event-based prospective memory. The data from study 2 suggest the SIE is not attributable to semantic processing or emotional processing and indicate that self-imagination is distinct from other mnemonic strategies. Overall the findings from the present study implicate self-imagination as a new and effective mnemonic strategy. The data also indicate that when it comes to memory there is something special about processing information in relation to the self.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectcognitive rehabilitationen_US
dc.subjectimaginationen_US
dc.subjectprospective memoryen_US
dc.subjectrecognition memoryen_US
dc.subjectself-referential processingen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGlisky, Elizabeth Len_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRyan, Leeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAllen, Johnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10447en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659752078en_US
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