A Phenomenology of Taste: Brewmasters and the production of lived taste experience

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193394
Title:
A Phenomenology of Taste: Brewmasters and the production of lived taste experience
Author:
Steiner, Robin Thomas
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Using a phenomenological account of perception drawn largely from the work of Merleau-Ponty (1962) and Gibson (1966; 1974), this thesis explores how perceptual experience is created and modified through practices and discourses. The project examines how a specific perceptual experience--the taste of beer--is formed through the practices and discourses of production. It investigates how both the nuanced taste experiences of brewmasters and the less precise taste experiences of their customers are cultivated in relation to a set of production concerns surrounding the manufacture of a consistent brand. Ultimately, it is argued that the production of brands--the urge to produce products which are identical to themselves--is a characteristic of consumer-oriented late capitalism which illustrates how mechanical reproduction influences the formation of contemporary sensory experiences and lifeworlds.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
beer; embodiement; Merleau-Ponty; perception; taste
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Silverstein, Brian
Committee Chair:
Silverstein, Brian

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleA Phenomenology of Taste: Brewmasters and the production of lived taste experienceen_US
dc.creatorSteiner, Robin Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.authorSteiner, Robin Thomasen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractUsing a phenomenological account of perception drawn largely from the work of Merleau-Ponty (1962) and Gibson (1966; 1974), this thesis explores how perceptual experience is created and modified through practices and discourses. The project examines how a specific perceptual experience--the taste of beer--is formed through the practices and discourses of production. It investigates how both the nuanced taste experiences of brewmasters and the less precise taste experiences of their customers are cultivated in relation to a set of production concerns surrounding the manufacture of a consistent brand. Ultimately, it is argued that the production of brands--the urge to produce products which are identical to themselves--is a characteristic of consumer-oriented late capitalism which illustrates how mechanical reproduction influences the formation of contemporary sensory experiences and lifeworlds.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectbeeren_US
dc.subjectembodiementen_US
dc.subjectMerleau-Pontyen_US
dc.subjectperceptionen_US
dc.subjecttasteen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSilverstein, Brianen_US
dc.contributor.chairSilverstein, Brianen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGeary, Adamen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMendoza-Denton, Normaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10454en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753410en_US
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