Reduction of Pathogens in Biosolids in Mexico Using Solar Drying Beds

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193386
Title:
Reduction of Pathogens in Biosolids in Mexico Using Solar Drying Beds
Author:
Dominguez Sanchez, Teodulo
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this study, die-off patterns of helminth ova, fecal coliforms, and Salmonella spp. in biosolids were documented using three small-scale sand drying beds located in a greenhouse. Treatments involved tilling the biosolids with differing frequencies. The results indicate that the inactivation rate for helminth ova was 0.88, 0.55, and 0.22 eggs/4 g TS day-1 for the intensively-tilled, moderately-tilled, and control beds, respectively. Achievement of Class A criteria was only possible in the intensively-tilled bed by Day 70 of the experiment. Salmonella spp. were inactivated to Class A levels in 9 days for the intensively and moderately-tilled beds. Regrowth of Salmonella spp. occurred thereafter in all beds, but high levels were seen only in the control bed. Fecal coliforms reached Class A criteria late in the experiment. Tilling treatments enhanced the inactivation rate of helminth ova and offer a potentially cost-effective method of pathogen reduction.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Ascaris eggs; biosolids; pathogens; sewer sludge; solar drying; tilling
Degree Name:
MSBiosyAgE
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Choi, Christopher Y.
Committee Chair:
Choi, Christopher Y.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleReduction of Pathogens in Biosolids in Mexico Using Solar Drying Bedsen_US
dc.creatorDominguez Sanchez, Teoduloen_US
dc.contributor.authorDominguez Sanchez, Teoduloen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this study, die-off patterns of helminth ova, fecal coliforms, and Salmonella spp. in biosolids were documented using three small-scale sand drying beds located in a greenhouse. Treatments involved tilling the biosolids with differing frequencies. The results indicate that the inactivation rate for helminth ova was 0.88, 0.55, and 0.22 eggs/4 g TS day-1 for the intensively-tilled, moderately-tilled, and control beds, respectively. Achievement of Class A criteria was only possible in the intensively-tilled bed by Day 70 of the experiment. Salmonella spp. were inactivated to Class A levels in 9 days for the intensively and moderately-tilled beds. Regrowth of Salmonella spp. occurred thereafter in all beds, but high levels were seen only in the control bed. Fecal coliforms reached Class A criteria late in the experiment. Tilling treatments enhanced the inactivation rate of helminth ova and offer a potentially cost-effective method of pathogen reduction.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectAscaris eggsen_US
dc.subjectbiosolidsen_US
dc.subjectpathogensen_US
dc.subjectsewer sludgeen_US
dc.subjectsolar dryingen_US
dc.subjecttillingen_US
thesis.degree.nameMSBiosyAgEen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural & Biosystems Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorChoi, Christopher Y.en_US
dc.contributor.chairChoi, Christopher Y.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1383en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137355369en_US
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