Spatial and Temporal Variability of Vertical Hydrologic Fluxes at The San Pedro River, AZ

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193384
Title:
Spatial and Temporal Variability of Vertical Hydrologic Fluxes at The San Pedro River, AZ
Author:
Soto-Lopez, Carlos Daniel
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Precipitation patterns in semi-arid river systems of the southwestern U.S. make stream-aquifer exchanges an important source of water in perennial rivers. Nonetheless, the spatial and temporal evolution of surface and ground water interaction are not fully understood. This research utilizes diurnal temperature oscillations as a tracer of vertical water fluxes by applying Stallman's analytical solution to a series of temperature time series recorded in the stream and in the streambed of the San Pedro River. Temperature measurements were recorded at four spatial extents using a nested hierarchy during four different periods since last flood. Time since last flood did not affect vertical fluxes significantly, but fluxes exhibited spatial dependence at lengths of 6-24 m. Stream geomorphic features influenced the magnitude of vertical fluxes; runs were more downwelling than riffles. The data suggests that the spatial distribution of vertical fluxes becomes more homogeneous as time since last flood increases.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Vertical; Fluxes; Temperature; San Pedro; Spatial; Variability
Degree Name:
MS
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Meixner, Thomas
Committee Chair:
Meixner, Thomas

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleSpatial and Temporal Variability of Vertical Hydrologic Fluxes at The San Pedro River, AZen_US
dc.creatorSoto-Lopez, Carlos Danielen_US
dc.contributor.authorSoto-Lopez, Carlos Danielen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPrecipitation patterns in semi-arid river systems of the southwestern U.S. make stream-aquifer exchanges an important source of water in perennial rivers. Nonetheless, the spatial and temporal evolution of surface and ground water interaction are not fully understood. This research utilizes diurnal temperature oscillations as a tracer of vertical water fluxes by applying Stallman's analytical solution to a series of temperature time series recorded in the stream and in the streambed of the San Pedro River. Temperature measurements were recorded at four spatial extents using a nested hierarchy during four different periods since last flood. Time since last flood did not affect vertical fluxes significantly, but fluxes exhibited spatial dependence at lengths of 6-24 m. Stream geomorphic features influenced the magnitude of vertical fluxes; runs were more downwelling than riffles. The data suggests that the spatial distribution of vertical fluxes becomes more homogeneous as time since last flood increases.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectVerticalen_US
dc.subjectFluxesen_US
dc.subjectTemperatureen_US
dc.subjectSan Pedroen_US
dc.subjectSpatialen_US
dc.subjectVariabilityen_US
thesis.degree.nameMSen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMeixner, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.chairMeixner, Thomasen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2813en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749518en_US
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