Cognitive Ecology of Foraging: Multimodal Signals and the Speed-Accuracy Trade-off

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193372
Title:
Cognitive Ecology of Foraging: Multimodal Signals and the Speed-Accuracy Trade-off
Author:
Kulahci, Ipek Gokce
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Many signals in nature are complex and composed of several components. However, the advantages and disadvantages of complex signaling are not completely understood. Although complex signals are advantageous for vertebrate decision-making processes, our understanding of whether similar advantages exist for invertebrates is limited. To investigate how signal complexity influences learning and decision-making in foraging bumblebees (Bombus impatiens), I trained them on unimodal (shape or olfactory) or multimodal (shape and olfactory) flowers. Addition of olfactory cues to visual cues improved the learning of bees. A speed-accuracy trade-off in decision-making reflects the difficulty of decisions. The bees trained on multimodal flowers made more accurate decisions without reducing their speed, and had higher target finding rates (correct visits/total decision time). These results suggest that bees forage more efficiently when flowers signal in more than one modality, and support arguments pointing out problems with studying signal components separately.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
MS
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Ecology & Evolutionary Biology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Papaj, Daniel R
Committee Chair:
Papaj, Daniel R

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleCognitive Ecology of Foraging: Multimodal Signals and the Speed-Accuracy Trade-offen_US
dc.creatorKulahci, Ipek Gokceen_US
dc.contributor.authorKulahci, Ipek Gokceen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMany signals in nature are complex and composed of several components. However, the advantages and disadvantages of complex signaling are not completely understood. Although complex signals are advantageous for vertebrate decision-making processes, our understanding of whether similar advantages exist for invertebrates is limited. To investigate how signal complexity influences learning and decision-making in foraging bumblebees (Bombus impatiens), I trained them on unimodal (shape or olfactory) or multimodal (shape and olfactory) flowers. Addition of olfactory cues to visual cues improved the learning of bees. A speed-accuracy trade-off in decision-making reflects the difficulty of decisions. The bees trained on multimodal flowers made more accurate decisions without reducing their speed, and had higher target finding rates (correct visits/total decision time). These results suggest that bees forage more efficiently when flowers signal in more than one modality, and support arguments pointing out problems with studying signal components separately.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameMSen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology & Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPapaj, Daniel Ren_US
dc.contributor.chairPapaj, Daniel Ren_US
dc.identifier.proquest2194en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747283en_US
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