Teens' Perceptions About Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Medications and Adaptation to Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193370
Title:
Teens' Perceptions About Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Medications and Adaptation to Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Author:
Knipp, Diana Kathleen
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This qualitative study describes teens' perceptions about AD/HD and medications. Roy's Adaptation Model's four modes of adaptation were the framework for this study. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 15 high school teens aged 14-17 with parent reported AD/HD. Findings of inductive analysis for modes: Physiologic (Medication), Medications are a hassle but they work; Role function, I do better in school when I take the meds; Interdependence, With meds things are better with my family and friends don't know I am any different; and Self-concept/group identity, I'm just an everyday teenager, pretty much. The composite main theme was: Meds help me. School nurses can use this knowledge to guide interventions for families and teens with AD/HD, healthcare providers, school teachers and staff, and communities in a multidisciplinary effort toward an adaptive educational experience compatible for teens.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD); AD/HD medications; teens' perceptions; school nurse; Meds help me
Degree Name:
MS
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Nursing; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Jones, Elaine
Committee Chair:
Jones, Elaine

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleTeens' Perceptions About Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Medications and Adaptation to Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorderen_US
dc.creatorKnipp, Diana Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorKnipp, Diana Kathleenen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis qualitative study describes teens' perceptions about AD/HD and medications. Roy's Adaptation Model's four modes of adaptation were the framework for this study. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 15 high school teens aged 14-17 with parent reported AD/HD. Findings of inductive analysis for modes: Physiologic (Medication), Medications are a hassle but they work; Role function, I do better in school when I take the meds; Interdependence, With meds things are better with my family and friends don't know I am any different; and Self-concept/group identity, I'm just an everyday teenager, pretty much. The composite main theme was: Meds help me. School nurses can use this knowledge to guide interventions for families and teens with AD/HD, healthcare providers, school teachers and staff, and communities in a multidisciplinary effort toward an adaptive educational experience compatible for teens.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectAttention deficit hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD)en_US
dc.subjectAD/HD medicationsen_US
dc.subjectteens' perceptionsen_US
dc.subjectschool nurseen_US
dc.subjectMeds help meen_US
thesis.degree.nameMSen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorJones, Elaineen_US
dc.contributor.chairJones, Elaineen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1312en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137354967en_US
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