Structural and Electrical Characterization of Discotic Liquid Crystalline Phthalocyanine for Application in Organic Devices

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193367
Title:
Structural and Electrical Characterization of Discotic Liquid Crystalline Phthalocyanine for Application in Organic Devices
Author:
Muriithi, Beatrice Wanjiku
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis focuses on characterization of the structural and electrical properties of 2, 3, 9, 10, 16, 17, 23, 24-Octa (2-hydroccinamyloxyethylsulfanyl) copper phthalocyanine and the effect of solvent on these properties. Film coherence, microstructure and electrical properties are all strongly dependent upon processing conditions.Recent advances in the design and organization of discotic materials for use in organic electronic devices have shown that the electronic properties depend on orientation, grain boundaries and defects in thin films. We have studied this specific liquid crystalline octasubstituted phthalocyanine, on modified substrates in several different solvent systems. Aggregation properties (solution and bulk) and the packing of this material (bulk) were found to depend on solvent system used. However, all the thin films prepared showed the typical columnar hexagonal packing of discotic materials. This material forms ohmic contact with gold and rectifying contacts with silver and aluminum contacts.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
MS
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Chemistry; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Armstrong, Neal R.
Committee Chair:
Armstrong, Neal R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleStructural and Electrical Characterization of Discotic Liquid Crystalline Phthalocyanine for Application in Organic Devicesen_US
dc.creatorMuriithi, Beatrice Wanjikuen_US
dc.contributor.authorMuriithi, Beatrice Wanjikuen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis focuses on characterization of the structural and electrical properties of 2, 3, 9, 10, 16, 17, 23, 24-Octa (2-hydroccinamyloxyethylsulfanyl) copper phthalocyanine and the effect of solvent on these properties. Film coherence, microstructure and electrical properties are all strongly dependent upon processing conditions.Recent advances in the design and organization of discotic materials for use in organic electronic devices have shown that the electronic properties depend on orientation, grain boundaries and defects in thin films. We have studied this specific liquid crystalline octasubstituted phthalocyanine, on modified substrates in several different solvent systems. Aggregation properties (solution and bulk) and the packing of this material (bulk) were found to depend on solvent system used. However, all the thin films prepared showed the typical columnar hexagonal packing of discotic materials. This material forms ohmic contact with gold and rectifying contacts with silver and aluminum contacts.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameMSen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorArmstrong, Neal R.en_US
dc.contributor.chairArmstrong, Neal R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1350en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137355172en_US
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