Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193361
Title:
The Effect of Satellite Cells on Angiogenesis
Author:
Johnson, Rebecca Marie
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Research for this thesis was conducted to study the mechanism by which satellite cells affect angiogenesis via hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We found that satellite cells exposed to hypoxia and cobalt chloride (CoCl2) had increased HIF-1 activity, greater VEGF gene expression, and higher levels of VEGF protein secreted into conditioned medium, when compared to satellite cells cultured in normoxia. The biological role of VEGF protein in satellite cell-mediated angiogenesis was observed when the growth of microvascular sprouts in satellite cell conditioned medium was inhibited by the addition of VEGF soluble receptors. This inhibition could be reversed when recombinant VEGF protein was added. Taken together, these data suggest that satellite cells mediate angiogenesis through the secretion of VEGF protein, and VEGF secretion can be increased upon exposure to a hypoxic environment.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
MS
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Animal Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Allen, Ronald E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Effect of Satellite Cells on Angiogenesisen_US
dc.creatorJohnson, Rebecca Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Rebecca Marieen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractResearch for this thesis was conducted to study the mechanism by which satellite cells affect angiogenesis via hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We found that satellite cells exposed to hypoxia and cobalt chloride (CoCl2) had increased HIF-1 activity, greater VEGF gene expression, and higher levels of VEGF protein secreted into conditioned medium, when compared to satellite cells cultured in normoxia. The biological role of VEGF protein in satellite cell-mediated angiogenesis was observed when the growth of microvascular sprouts in satellite cell conditioned medium was inhibited by the addition of VEGF soluble receptors. This inhibition could be reversed when recombinant VEGF protein was added. Taken together, these data suggest that satellite cells mediate angiogenesis through the secretion of VEGF protein, and VEGF secretion can be increased upon exposure to a hypoxic environment.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameMSen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnimal Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairAllen, Ronald E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest2265en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748104en_US
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